Monthly Archives: August 2016

Home automation pet project. Playing with IoT, temperature sensors, fans and Telegram bots

Summer holidays are over. Besides my bush walks I’ve been also hacking a little bit with one idea that I had in mind. Summer means high temperatures and I wanted to control my fan. For example turn on the fan when temperature is over a threshold. I can do it using an Arduino board and a temperature sensor, but I don’t have the one Arduino board. I have several devices. For example a Wemo switch. With this device connected to my Wifi network I can switch on and off my fan remotely from my mobile phone (using its android app) or even from my Pebble watch using the API. I also have a BeeWi temperature/humidity sensor. It’s a BTLE device. It comes with its own app for android, but there’s also a API. Yes. I known that one Arduino board with a couple of sensors can be cheaper than one of this devices, but when I’m a shop and I’ve got one of this devices in my hands I cannot resist.

I also have a new Raspberry pi 3. I’ve recently upgraded my home multimedia server from a rpi2 to the new rpi3. Basically I use it as multimedia server and now also as retro console. This new rpi3 has Bluetooth so I wanted to do something with it. Read temperature from the Bluetooth sensor sounds good so I started to hack a little bit.

I found this post. I started working with Python. The script almost works but it uses Bluetooth connection and as someone said in the comments it uses a lot of battery. So I switched to a BTLE version. I found a simple node library to connect BTLE devices called noble, really simple to use. In one afternoon I had one small script ready. The idea was put this script in my RP3’s crontab, and scan the temperature each minute (via noble) and if the temperature was over a threshold switch on the wemo device (via ouimeaux). I also wanted to be informed when my fan is switch on and off. The most easier way to do it was via Telegram (I already knew telebot library).

var noble = require('noble'),
    Wemo = require('wemo-client'),
    TeleBot = require('telebot'),
    fs = require('fs'),
    beeWiData,
    wemo,
    threshold,
    address,
    bot,
    chatId,
    wemoDevice,
    configuration,
    confPath;

if (process.argv.length <= 2) {
    console.log("Usage: " + __filename + " conf.json");
    process.exit(-1);
}

confPath = process.argv[2];
try {
    configuration = JSON.parse(
        fs.readFileSync(process.argv[2])
    );
} catch (e) {
    console.log("configuration file not valid");
    process.exit(-1);
}

bot = new TeleBot(configuration.telegramBotAPIKey);
address = configuration.beeWiAddress;
threshold = configuration.threshold;
wemoDevice = configuration.wemoDevice;
chatId = configuration.telegramChatId;

function persists() {
    configuration.beeWiData = beeWiData;
    fs.writeFileSync(confPath, JSON.stringify(configuration));
}

function setSwitchState(state, callback) {
    wemo = new Wemo();
    wemo.discover(function(deviceInfo) {
        if (deviceInfo.friendlyName == wemoDevice) {
            console.log("device found:", deviceInfo.friendlyName, "setting the state to", state);
            var client = wemo.client(deviceInfo);
            client.on('binaryState', function(value) {
                callback();
            });

            client.on('statusChange', function(a) {
                console.log("statusChange", a);
            });
            client.setBinaryState(state);
        }
    });
}

beeWiData = {temperature: undefined, humidity: undefined, batery: undefined};

function hexToInt(hex) {
    if (hex.length % 2 !== 0) {
        hex = "0" + hex;
    }
    var num = parseInt(hex, 16);
    var maxVal = Math.pow(2, hex.length / 2 * 8);
    if (num > maxVal / 2 - 1) {
        num = num - maxVal;
    }
    return num;
}

noble.on('stateChange', function(state) {
    if (state === 'poweredOn') {
        noble.stopScanning();
        noble.startScanning();
    } else {
        noble.stopScanning();
    }
});

noble.on('scanStop', function() {
    var message, state;
    if (beeWiData.temperature > threshold) {
        state = 1;
        message = "temperature (" + beeWiData.temperature + ") over threshold (" + threshold + "). Fan ON. Humidity: " + beeWiData.humidity;
    } else {
        message = "temperature (" + beeWiData.temperature + ") under threshold (" + threshold + "). Fan OFF. Humidity: " + beeWiData.humidity;
        state = 0;
    }
    setSwitchState(state, function() {
        if (configuration.beeWiData.hasOwnProperty('temperature') && configuration.beeWiData.temperature < threshold && state === 1 || configuration.beeWiData.temperature > threshold && state === 0) {
            console.log("Notify to telegram bot", message);
            bot.sendMessage(chatId, message).then(function() {
                process.exit(0);
            }, function(e) {
                console.error(e);
                process.exit(0);
            });
            persists();
        } else {
            console.log(message);
            persists();
            process.exit(0);
        }
    });
});

noble.on('discover', function(peripheral) {
    if (peripheral.address == address) {
        var data = peripheral.advertisement.manufacturerData.toString('hex');
        beeWiData.temperature = parseFloat(hexToInt(data.substr(10, 2)+data.substr(8, 2))/10).toFixed(1);
        beeWiData.humidity = Math.min(100,parseInt(data.substr(14, 2),16));
        beeWiData.batery = parseInt(data.substr(24, 2),16);
        beeWiData.date = new Date();
        noble.stopScanning();
    }
});

setTimeout(function() {
    console.error("timeout exceded!");
    process.exit(0);
}, 5000);

The script is here.

It works but I wanted to keep on hacking. One Sunday morning I read this post. I don’t have an amazon button, but I wanted to do something similar. I started to play with scapy library sniffing ARP packets in my home network. I realize that I can detect when my Kindle connects to the network, my tv, or even my mobile phone. Then I had one I idea: Detect when my mobile phone connects to my wifi. My mobile phone connects to my wifi before I enter in my house so my idea was simple: Detect when I’m close to my home’s door and send me a telegram message saying “Wellcome home” in addition to the temperature inside my house at this moment.

#!/usr/bin/env python

import sys
from scapy.all import *
import telebot
import gearman
import json
from StringIO import StringIO

BUFFER_SIZE = 1024

try:
    with open(sys.argv[1]) as data_file:
        data = json.load(data_file)
        myPhone = data['myPhone']
        routerIP = data['routerIP']
        TOKEN = data['telegramBotAPIKey']
        chatID = data['telegramChatId']
        gearmanServer = data['gearmanServer']
except:
    print("Unexpected error:", sys.exc_info()[0])
    raise

def getSensorData():
    gm_client = gearman.GearmanClient([gearmanServer])
    completed_job_request = gm_client.submit_job("temp", '')
    io = StringIO(completed_job_request.result)

    return json.load(io)

tb = telebot.TeleBot(TOKEN)

def arp_display(pkt):
    if pkt[ARP].op == 1 and pkt[ARP].hwsrc == myPhone and pkt[ARP].pdst == routerIP:
        sensorData = getSensorData()
        message = "Wellcome home Gonzalo! Temperature: %s humidity: %s" % (sensorData['temperature'], sensorData['humidity'])
        tb.send_message(chatID, message)
        print message

print sniff(prn=arp_display, filter='arp', store=0)

I have one node script to read temperature and one Python script to sniff my network. I can find how to read temperature from Python and use only one script but I was lazy (remember that I was on holiday) so I turned the node script that reads temperature into a gearman worker.

var noble = require('noble'),
    fs = require('fs'),
    Gearman = require('node-gearman'),
    beeWiData,
    address,
    bot,
    configuration,
    confPath,
    status,
    callback;

var gearman = new Gearman();

if (process.argv.length <= 2) {
    console.log("Usage: " + __filename + " conf.json");
    process.exit(-1);
}

confPath = process.argv[2];
try {
    configuration = JSON.parse(
        fs.readFileSync(process.argv[2])
    );
} catch (e) {
    console.log("configuration file not valid", e);
    process.exit(-1);
}

address = configuration.beeWiAddress;
delay = configuration.tempServerDelayMinutes * 60 * 1000;
tcpPort = configuration.tempServerPort;

beeWiData = {};

function hexToInt(hex) {
    if (hex.length % 2 !== 0) {
        hex = "0" + hex;
    }
    var num = parseInt(hex, 16);
    var maxVal = Math.pow(2, hex.length / 2 * 8);
    if (num > maxVal / 2 - 1) {
        num = num - maxVal;
    }
    return num;
}

noble.on('stateChange', function(state) {
    if (state === 'poweredOn') {
        console.log("stateChange:poweredOn");
        status = true;
    } else {
        status = false;
    }
});

noble.on('discover', function(peripheral) {
    if (peripheral.address == address) {
        var data = peripheral.advertisement.manufacturerData.toString('hex');
        beeWiData.temperature = parseFloat(hexToInt(data.substr(10, 2)+data.substr(8, 2))/10).toFixed(1);
        beeWiData.humidity = Math.min(100,parseInt(data.substr(14, 2),16));
        beeWiData.batery = parseInt(data.substr(24, 2),16);
        beeWiData.date = new Date();
        noble.stopScanning();
    }
});

noble.on('scanStop', function() {
    console.log(beeWiData);
    noble.stopScanning();
    callback();
});

var worker;

function workerCallback(payload, worker) {
    callback = function() {
        worker.end(JSON.stringify(beeWiData));
    }

    beeWiData = {temperature: undefined, humidity: undefined, batery: undefined};

    if (status) {
        noble.stopScanning();
        noble.startScanning();
    } else {
        setInterval(function() {
            workerCallback(payload, worker);
        }, 1000);
    }
}

gearman.registerWorker("temp", workerCallback);

Now I only need to call this worker from my Python sniffer and thats all.

I wanted to play a little bit. I also wanted to ask the temperature on demand. Since I was using Telegram I had an idea. Create a Telegram bot running in my RP3. And that’s my summer pet project. Basically it has three parts:

worker.js
It’s a gearman worker. It reads temperature and humidity from my BeeWi sensor via BTLE

bot.py
It’s a Telegram bot with the following commands available:

/switchInfo: get switch info
/switchOFF: switch OFF the switch
/help: Gives you information about the available commands
/temp: Get temperature
/switchON: switch ON the switch

sniff.py
It’s just a ARP sniffer. It detects when I’m close to my home and sends me a message via Telegram with the temperature. It detects when my mobile phone sends a ARP package to my router (aka when I connect to my Wifi). It happens before I enter in my house, so the Telegram message arrives before I put the key in the door 🙂

I run al my scripts in my Raspberry Pi3. To ensure all scripts are up an running I use supervisor

All the scripts are available in my github account

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i18n angular2 service

This days I’m learning angular2 and ionic2. My first impression was bad. Too many new things: angular2, typescript, new project architecture, … but after passing those bad moments I started to like angular2. One of the first things that I want to work with is internationalization. There’re several i18n providers for angular2. For example ng2-translate, but I want to build something similar to a angular i18n provider that I’d created time ago.

The idea is first configure the service

import {Component} from "@angular/core";
import {Platform, ionicBootstrap} from "ionic-angular";
import {StatusBar} from "ionic-native";
import {HomePage} from "./pages/home/home";
import {I18nService} from "./services/i18n/I18nService";
import {lang} from "./conf/conf";

@Component({
    template: '<ion-nav [root]="rootPage"></ion-nav>'
})
export class MyApp {
    rootPage:any = HomePage;

    constructor(platform:Platform, i18n:I18nService) {
        platform.ready().then(() => {
            i18n.init(lang);
            StatusBar.styleDefault();
        });
    }
}

ionicBootstrap(MyApp, [I18nService]);

We can see that we’re using one configuration from conf/conf.ts

var lang = {
    availableLangs: {
        en: 'English'
    },
    defaultLang: 'en',
    lang: {
        "true": {
            en: "True",
            es: "Verdadero"
        },
        "false": {
            en: "False",
            es: "Falso"
        },
    }
};

export {lang};

Now we can translate texts using:

import {Component} from "@angular/core";
import {I18nService} from "../../services/i18n/I18nService";

@Component({
    templateUrl: 'build/pages/home/home.html'
})
export class HomePage {
    constructor(private i18n:I18nService) {
    }

    label1:string = this.i18n.translate('true');
    label2:string = 'true';
    
    ngOnInit() {
        setInterval(() => {
            this.label2 = this.i18n.translate(this.label2 == 'false' ? 'true' : 'false');
        }, 2000);
    }
}

We also need a Pipe to use i18n within templates

{{ "true" | i18n }}

This is the service:

import {Injectable, Pipe} from "@angular/core";

@Injectable()
export class I18nService {

    private conf:any;
    private userLang:string;
    private lang:any;

    setUserLang(lang:string):void {
        this.userLang = lang;
    }

    init(lang:any):void {
        this.conf = lang;
        this.setUserLang(lang.defaultLang);
    }

    translate(key:string):string {
        if (typeof this.conf.lang !== 'undefined' && this.conf.lang.hasOwnProperty(key)) {
            return this.conf.lang[key][this.userLang] || key;
        } else {
            return key;
        }
    }
}

@Pipe({
    name: 'i18n',
    pure: false
})
export class I18nPipe {
    constructor(private i18n:I18nService) {
    }

    transform(key:string) {
        return this.i18n.translate(key);
    }
}

The code is in my github account. I also have tried to created a npm package and install it using

npm install angular2-i18n --save

I don’t know why it doesn’t work when I use the npm installed package and I works like a charm when I use the code in my project directory

import {I18nService} from "./services/i18n/I18nService"; // works
import {I18nService} from "angular2-i18n/src/I18nService"; // don't work

I also have problems with unit tests. It works when I run the tests locally (it works on my machine 🙂 ) but it doesn’t work when I run them in travis. Any help with those two problems would be appreciated.