Monthly Archives: August 2017

Taking photos with an ionic2 application and upload them to S3 Bucket with SAP’s Cloud Foundry using Silex and Lumen

Today I want to play with an experiment. When I work with mobile applications, I normally use ionic and on-premise backends. Today I want play with cloud based backends. In this small experiment I want to use an ionic2 application to take pictures and upload them to an S3 bucket. Let’s start.

First I’ve created a simple ionic2 application. It’s a very simple application. Only one page with a button to trigger the device’s camera.

<ion-header>
    <ion-navbar>
        <ion-title>
            Photo
        </ion-title>
    </ion-navbar>
</ion-header>

<ion-content padding>
    <ion-fab bottom right>
        <button ion-fab (click)="takePicture()">
            <ion-icon  name="camera"></ion-icon>
        </button>
    </ion-fab>
</ion-content>

The controller uses @ionic-native/camera to take photos and later we use @ionic-native/transfer to upload them to the backend.

import {Component} from '@angular/core';
import {Camera, CameraOptions} from '@ionic-native/camera';
import {Transfer, FileUploadOptions, TransferObject} from '@ionic-native/transfer';
import {ToastController} from 'ionic-angular';
import {LoadingController} from 'ionic-angular';

@Component({
    selector: 'page-home',
    templateUrl: 'home.html'
})
export class HomePage {
    constructor(private transfer: Transfer,
                private camera: Camera,
                public toastCtrl: ToastController,
                public loading: LoadingController) {
    }

    takePicture() {
        const options: CameraOptions = {
            quality: 100,
            destinationType: this.camera.DestinationType.FILE_URI,
            sourceType: this.camera.PictureSourceType.CAMERA,
            encodingType: this.camera.EncodingType.JPEG,
            targetWidth: 1000,
            targetHeight: 1000,
            saveToPhotoAlbum: false,
            correctOrientation: true
        };

        this.camera.getPicture(options).then((uri) => {
            const fileTransfer: TransferObject = this.transfer.create();

            let options: FileUploadOptions = {
                fileKey: 'file',
                fileName: uri.substr(uri.lastIndexOf('/') + 1),
                chunkedMode: true,
                headers: {
                    Connection: "close"
                },
                params: {
                    metadata: {foo: 'bar'},
                    token: 'mySuperSecretToken'
                }
            };

            let loader = this.loading.create({
                content: 'Uploading ...',
            });

            loader.present().then(() => {
                let s3UploadUri = 'https://myApp.cfapps.eu10.hana.ondemand.com/upload';
                fileTransfer.upload(uri, s3UploadUri, options).then((data) => {
                    let message;
                    let response = JSON.parse(data.response);
                    if (response['status']) {
                        message = 'Picture uploaded to S3: ' + response['key']
                    } else {
                        message = 'Error Uploading to S3: ' + response['error']
                    }
                    loader.dismiss();
                    let toast = this.toastCtrl.create({
                        message: message,
                        duration: 3000
                    });
                    toast.present();
                }, (err) => {
                    loader.dismiss();
                    let toast = this.toastCtrl.create({
                        message: "Error",
                        duration: 3000
                    });
                    toast.present();
                });
            });
        });
    }
}

Now let’s work with the backend. Next time I’ll use JavaScript AWS SDK to upload pictures directly from mobile application (without backend), but today We’ll use a backend. Nowadays I’m involved with SAP Cloud platform projects, so we’ll use SAP’s Cloud Foundry tenant (using a free account). In this tenant we’ll create a PHP application using the PHP buildpack with nginx

applications:
– name: myApp
path: .
memory: 128MB
buildpack: php_buildpack

The PHP application is a simple Silex application to handle the file uploads and post the pictures to S3 using the official AWS SDK for PHP (based on Guzzle)

use Symfony\Component\HttpFoundation\Request;
use Silex\Application;
use Aws\S3\S3Client;

require 'vendor/autoload.php';

$app = new Application([
    'debug'        => false,
    'aws.config'   => [
        'debug'       => false,
        'version'     => 'latest',
        'region'      => 'eu-west-1',
        'credentials' => [
            'key'    => $_ENV['s3key'],
            'secret' => $_ENV['s3secret'],
        ],
    ],
]);

$app['aws'] = function () use ($app) {
    return new S3Client($app['aws.config']);
};

$app->post('/upload', function (Request $request, Application $app) {
    $metadata = json_decode($request->get('metadata'), true);
    $token    = $request->get('token');

    if ($token === $_ENV['token']) {
        $fileName = $_FILES['file']['name'];
        $fileType = $_FILES['file']['type'];
        $tmpName  = $_FILES['file']['tmp_name'];

        /** @var \Aws\S3\S3Client $s3 */
        $s3 = $app['aws'];
        try {
            $key = date('YmdHis') . "_" . $fileName;
            $s3->putObject([
                'Bucket'      => $_ENV['s3bucket'],
                'Key'         => $key,
                'SourceFile'  => $tmpName,
                'ContentType' => $fileType,
                'Metadata'    => $metadata,
            ]);
            unlink($tmpName);

            return $app->json([
                'status' => true,
                'key'    => $key,
            ]);
        } catch (Aws\S3\Exception\S3Exception $e) {
            return $app->json([
                'status' => false,
                'error'  => $e->getMessage(),
            ]);
        }
    } else {
        return $app->json([
            'status' => false,
            'error'  => "Token error",
        ]);
    }
});

$app->run();

I just wanted a simple prototype (a working one). Enough for a Sunday morning hacking.

UPDATE

I had this post ready weeks ago but something has changed. Silex is dead. So, as an exercise I’ll migrate current Silex application to Lumen (a quick prototype).

That’s the main application.

use App\Http\Middleware;
use Aws\S3\S3Client;
use Illuminate\Http\Request;
use Laravel\Lumen\Application;

require 'vendor/autoload.php';

(new Dotenv\Dotenv(__DIR__ . "/../env"))->load();

$app = new Application();

$app->routeMiddleware([
    'auth' => Middleware\AuthMiddleware::class,
]);

$app->register(App\Providers\S3ServiceProvider::class);

$app->group(['middleware' => 'auth'], function (Application $app) {
    $app->post('/upload', function (Request $request, Application $app, S3Client $s3) {
        $metadata = json_decode($request->get('metadata'), true);
        $fileName = $_FILES['file']['name'];
        $fileType = $_FILES['file']['type'];
        $tmpName  = $_FILES['file']['tmp_name'];

        try {
            $key = date('YmdHis') . "_" . $fileName;
            $s3->putObject([
                'Bucket'      => getenv('s3bucket'),
                'Key'         => $key,
                'SourceFile'  => $tmpName,
                'ContentType' => $fileType,
                'Metadata'    => $metadata,
            ]);
            unlink($tmpName);

            return response()->json([
                'status' => true,
                'key'    => $key,
            ]);
        } catch (Aws\S3\Exception\S3Exception $e) {
            return response()->json([
                'status' => false,
                'error'  => $e->getMessage(),
            ]);
        }
    });
});

$app->run();

Probably we can find a S3 Service provider, but I’ve built a simple one for this example.

namespace App\Providers;

use Illuminate\Support\ServiceProvider;
use Aws\S3\S3Client;

class S3ServiceProvider extends ServiceProvider
{
    public function register()
    {
        $this->app->bind(S3Client::class, function ($app) {
            $conf = [
                'debug'       => false,
                'version'     => getenv('AWS_VERSION'),
                'region'      => getenv('AWS_REGION'),
                'credentials' => [
                    'key'    => getenv('s3key'),
                    'secret' => getenv('s3secret'),
                ],
            ];

            return new S3Client($conf);
        });
    }
}

And also I’m using a middleware for the authentication

namespace App\Http\Middleware;

use Closure;
use Illuminate\Http\Request;

class AuthMiddleware
{
    public function handle(Request $request, Closure $next)
    {
        $token = $request->get('token');
        if ($token === getenv('token')) {
            return response('Admin Login', 401);
        }

        return $next($request);
    }
}

Ok. I’ll post this article soon. At least before Lumen will be dead also, and I need to update this post again 🙂

Full project (mobile application and both backends) in my githubgithub

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Controlling bedside lamp with the TV’s remote using Arduino and IR receiver.

I’ve got a new Arduino board (Arduino nano) and I want to hack a little bit. Today I want to play with IR receiver. My idea is to use my TV’s remote and switch on/off one bedside lamp, using one relay. It’s a simple Arduino program. First we need to include de IRremote library.

#include <IRremote.h>

#define IR 11
#define RELAY 9

IRrecv irrecv(IR);
IRsend irsender;
decode_results results;

unsigned long code;

void setup()
{
  pinMode(RELAY, OUTPUT);
  digitalWrite(RELAY, LOW);

  irrecv.blink13(true);
  irrecv.enableIRIn();
}

void loop() {
  if (irrecv.decode(&results)) {
    unsigned long current = results.value;
    if (current != code) {
      code = current;
      switch (code) {
        case 3772833823:
          digitalWrite(RELAY, HIGH);
          break;
        case 3772829743:
          digitalWrite(RELAY, LOW);
          break;
      }
    }

    irrecv.resume();
    delay(100);
  }
}

Normally IR receivers have three pins. Vcc (5V), Gnd and signal. We only need to connect the IR receiver to our Arduino and see which hex codes uses our TV’s remote. Then we only need to fire our relay depending on the code.

The circuit:

The hardware:

  • 1 Arduino Nano
  • 1 IR receiver
  • 1 Relay
  • 1 Red led
  • a couple of pull down resistors

Source code is available in my github.