Blog Archives

Sharing authentication between socket.io and a PHP frontend

Normally, when I work with websockets, my stack is a socket.io server and a Silex frontend. Protect a PHP frontend with one kind of authentication of another is pretty straightforward. But if we want to use websockets, we need to set up another server and if we protect our frontend we need to protect our websocket server too.

If our frontend is node too (express for example), sharing authentication is more easy but at this time we we want to use two different servers (a node server and a PHP server). I’ve written about it too but today we`ll see another solution. Let’s start.

Imagine we have this simple Silex application. It has three routes:

  • “/” a public route
  • “/login” to perform the login action
  • “/private” a private route. If we try to get here without a valid session we’ll get a 403 error

And this is the code. It’s basically one example using sessions taken from Silex documentation:

use Silex\Application;
use Silex\Provider\SessionServiceProvider;
use Silex\Provider\TwigServiceProvider;
use Symfony\Component\HttpFoundation\Response;
use Symfony\Component\HttpKernel\Exception\AccessDeniedHttpException;

$app = new Application();

$app->register(new SessionServiceProvider());
$app->register(new TwigServiceProvider(), [
    'twig.path' => __DIR__ . '/../views',
]);

$app->get('/', function (Application $app) {
    return $app['twig']->render('home.twig');
});

$app->get('/login', function () use ($app) {
    $username = $app['request']->server->get('PHP_AUTH_USER', false);
    $password = $app['request']->server->get('PHP_AUTH_PW');

    if ('gonzalo' === $username && 'password' === $password) {
        $app['session']->set('user', ['username' => $username]);

        return $app->redirect('/private');
    }

    $response = new Response();
    $response->headers->set('WWW-Authenticate', sprintf('Basic realm="%s"', 'site_login'));
    $response->setStatusCode(401, 'Please sign in.');

    return $response;
});

$app->get('/private', function () use ($app) {
    $user = $app['session']->get('user');
    if (null === $user) {
        throw new AccessDeniedHttpException('Access Denied');
    }

    return $app['twig']->render('private.twig', [
        'username'  => $user['username']
    ]);
});

$app->run();

Our “/private” route also creates a connection with our websocket server.

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html lang="en">
<head>
    <meta charset="UTF-8">
    <title>Title</title>
</head>
<body>
Welcome {{ username }}!

<script src="http://localhost:3000/socket.io/socket.io.js"></script>
<script>
    var socket = io('http://localhost:3000/');
    socket.on('connect', function () {
        console.log("connected!");
    });
    socket.on('disconnect', function () {
        console.log("disconnected!");
    });
</script>

</body>
</html>

And that’s our socket.io server. A really simple one.

var io = require('socket.io')(3000);

It works. Our frontend is protected. We need to login with our credentials (in this example “gonzalo/password”), but everyone can connect to our socket.io server. The idea is to use our PHP session to protect our socket.io server too. In fact is very easy how to do it. First we need to pass our PHPSESSID to our socket.io server. To do it, when we perform our socket.io connection in the frontend, we pass our session id

<script>
    var socket = io('http://localhost:3000/', {
        query: 'token={{ sessionId }}'
    });
    socket.on('connect', function () {
        console.log("connected!");
    });
    socket.on('disconnect', function () {
        console.log("disconnect!");
    });
</script>

As well as we’re using a twig template we need to pass sessionId variable

$app->get('/private', function () use ($app) {
    $user = $app['session']->get('user');
    if (null === $user) {
        throw new AccessDeniedHttpException('Access Denied');
    }

    return $app['twig']->render('private.twig', [
        'username'  => $user['username'],
        'sessionId' => $app['session']->getId()
    ]);
});

Now we only need to validate the token before stabilising connection. Socket.io provides us a middleware to perform those kind of operations. In this example we’re using PHP sessions out of the box. How can we validate it? The answer is easy. We only need to create a http client (in the socket.io server) and perform a request to a protected route (we’ll use “/private”). If we’re using a different provider to store our sessions (I hope you aren’t using Memcached to store PHP session, indeed) you’ll need to validate our sessionId against your provider.

var io = require('socket.io')(3000),
    http = require('http');

io.use(function (socket, next) {
    var options = {
        host: 'localhost',
        port: 8080,
        path: '/private',
        headers: {Cookie: 'PHPSESSID=' + socket.handshake.query.token}
    };

    http.request(options, function (response) {
        response.on('error', function () {
            next(new Error("not authorized"));
        }).on('data', function () {
            next();
        });
    }).end();
});

io.on('connection', function () {
    console.log("connected!");
});

Ok. This example works but we’re generating dynamically a js file injecting our PHPSESSID. If we want to extract the sessionId from the request we can use document.cookie but sometimes it doesn’t work. That’s because HttpOnly. HttpOnly is our friend if we want to protect our cookies against XSS attacks but in this case our protection difficults our task.

We can solve this problem performing a simple request to our server. We’ll create a new route (a private route) called ‘getSessionID’ that gives us our sessionId.

$app->get('/getSessionID', function (Application $app) {
    $user = $app['session']->get('user');
    if (null === $user) {
        throw new AccessDeniedHttpException('Access Denied');
    }

    return $app->json($app['session']->getId());
});

So before establishing the websocket we just need to create a GET request to our new route to obtain the sessionID.

var io = require('socket.io')(3000),
    http = require('http');

io.use(function (socket, next) {
    var sessionId = socket.handshake.query.token,
        options = {
            host: 'localhost',
            port: 8080,
            path: '/getSessionID',
            headers: {Cookie: 'PHPSESSID=' + sessionId}
        };

    http.request(options, function (response) {
        response.on('error', function () {
            next(new Error("not authorized"));
        });
        response.on('data', function (chunk) {
            var sessionIdFromRequest;
            try {
                sessionIdFromRequest = JSON.parse(chunk.toString());
            } catch (e) {
                next(new Error("not authorized"));
            }

            if (sessionId == sessionIdFromRequest) {
                next();
            } else {
                next(new Error("not authorized"));
            }
        });
    }).end();
});

io.on('connection', function (socket) {
    setInterval(function() {
        socket.emit('hello', {hello: 'world'});
    }, 1000);
});

And thats all. You can see the full example in my github account.

Working with Ionic and PHP Backends. Remote debugging with PHP7 and Xdebug working with real devices

Sometimes I speak with PHP developers and they don’t use remote debugging in their development environments. Some people don’t like to use remote debugging. They prefer to use TDD and rely on the unit tests. That’s a good point of view, but sometimes they don’t use remote debugging only because they don’t know how to do it, and that’s inadmissible. Remote debugger is a powerful tool especially to handle with legacy applications. I’ve using xdebug for years with my linux workstation for years. This days I’m using Mac and it’s also very simple to set up xdebug here.

First we need to install PHP:

brew install php70

Then Xdebug

brew install php70-xdebug

(in a Ubuntu box we only need to use apt-get instead of brew)

Now we need to setup xdebug to enable remote debugging:
In a standard installation xdebug configuration is located at: /usr/local/etc/php/7.0/conf.d/ext-xdebug.ini

[xdebug]
zend_extension="/usr/local/opt/php70-xdebug/xdebug.so"

xdebug.remote_enable=1
xdebug.remote_port=9000
xdebug.profiler_enable=0
xdebug.profiler_output_dir="/tmp"
xdebug.idekey= "PHPSTORM"
xdebug.remote_connect_back = 1
xdebug.max_nesting_level = 250

And basically that’s all. To set/unset the cookie you can use one bookmarklet in your browser (you can generate your bookmarklets here). Or use a Chrome extension to enable xdebug.

Now se only need to start the built-in server with

php -S 0.0.0.0:8080

And remote debugging will be available
Remote debugger works this way:

  • We open on port within our IDE. In my case PHPStorm (it happens when we click on “Start listening for PHP debug connections”)
  • We set one cookie in our browser (it happens when click on Chrome extension)
  • When our server receives one request with the cookie, it connects to the port that our IDE opens (usually port 9000). If you use a personal firewall in your workstation, ensure that you allow incoming connections to this port.

Nowadays I’m involved with several projects building hybrid applications with Apache Cordova. In the Frontend I’m using ionic and Silex in the Backend. When I’m working with hybrid applications normally I go through two phases.

In the first one I build a working prototype. To to this I run a local server and I use my browser to develop the application. This phase is very similar than a traditional Web development process. If we also set up properly LiveReload, our application will be reloaded each time we change one javaScript file. Ionic framework integrates LiveReload and we only need to run:

ionic serve -l

to start our application. We also need to start our backend server. For example

php -S 0.0.0.0:8080 -t api/www

Now we can debug our Backend with remote debugger and Frontend with Chrome’s developer’s tools. Chrome also allows us to edit Frontend files and save them within the filesystem using workspaces. This phase is the easy one. But sooner or later we’ll need start working with a real device. We need a real device basically if we use plugins such as Camera plugin, Geolocation plugin, or things like that. OK there are emulators, but usually emulators don’t allow to use all plugins in the same way than we use then with a real device. Chrome also allow us to see the console logs of the device from our workstation. OK we can see all logs of our plugged Android device using “adb logcat” but follow the flow of our logs with logcat is similar than understand Matrix code. It’s a mess.

If we plug our android device to our computer and we open with Chrome:

chrome://inspect/#devices

We can see our device’s console, use breakpoints and things like that. Cool, isn’t it? Of course it only works if we compile our application without “–release” option. We can do something similar with Safary and iOS devices.

With ionic if we want to use LiveReload from the real device and not to recompile and re-install again and again our application each time we change our javaScript files, we can run the application using

ionic run android --device -l

When we’re developing our application and we’re in this phase we also need to handle with CORS. CORS isn’t a problem when we run our hybrid application in production. When we run the hybrid application with our device our “origin” is the local filesystem. That’s means CORS don’t apply, but when we run our application in the device, but served from our computer (when we use “-l” option), our origin isn’t local filesystem. So if our Backend is served from another origin we need to enable CORS.

We can enable CORS in the backend. I’ve written about it here, but ionic people allows us a easier way. We can set up a local proxy to serve our backend through the same origin than the application does and forget about CORS. Here we can read a good article about it.

Anyway if we want to start the remote debugger we need to create one cookie called XDEBUG_SESSION. In the browser we can use chrome extension, but when we inspect the plugged device isn’t so simple. It would be cool that ionic people allows us to inject cookies to our proxy server. I’ve try to see how to do it with ionic-cli. Maybe is possible but I didn’t realize how to do it. Because of that I’ve created a simple AngularJS service to inject this cookie. Then, if I start listening debug connections in my IDE I’ll be able to use remote debugger as well as I do when I work with the browser.

First we need to install service via Bower:

bower install ng-xdebugger --save

Now we need to include javaScript files

<script src="lib/angular-cookies/angular-cookies.min.js"></script>
<script src="lib/ng-xdebugger/dist/gonzalo123.xdebugger.min.js"></script>

then we add our service to the project.

angular.module("starter", ["ionic", "gonzalo123.xdebugger"])

Now we only need to configure our application and set de debugger key (it must be the same key than we use within the server-side configuration of xdebug)

.config(function (xdebuggerProvider) {
        xdebuggerProvider.setKey('PHPSTORM');
    })
})

And that’s all. The service is very simple. It only uses one http interceptor to inject the cookie in our http requests:

(function () {
    "use strict";

    angular.module("gonzalo123.xdebugger", ["ngCookies"])
        .provider("xdebugger", ['$httpProvider', function ($httpProvider) {
            var debugKey;

            this.$get = function () {
                return {
                    getDebugKey: function () {
                        return debugKey;
                    }
                };
            };

            this.setKey = function (string) {
                if (string) {
                    debugKey = string;
                    $httpProvider.interceptors.push("xdebuggerCookieInterceptor");
                }
            };
        }])

        .factory("xdebuggerCookieInterceptor", ['$cookieStore', 'xdebugger', function ($cookieStore, xdebugger) {
            return {
                response: function (response) {
                    $cookieStore.put("XDEBUG_SESSION", xdebugger.getDebugKey());

                    return response;
                }
            };
        }])
    ;
})();

And of course you can see the whole project in my github account.

Book review: Socket.IO Cookbook

Last summer I collaborated as a technical reviewer in the book “Socket.IO Cookbook” written by Tyson Cadenhead and finally I’ve got the book in my hands

I’m a big fan of real time technologies and I’m normally Socket.io user. Because of that, when people of Packt Publishing contacted me to join to the project as technical reviewer my answer was yes. I’ve got serious problems nowadays to find time to pet projects and extra activities, but if there’re WebSockets inside I cannot resists.

The book is correct and it’s a good starting point to event-based communication with JavaScript. I normally don’t like beginners books (even if I’m a beginner in the technology). I don’t like the books where author explains how to do one thing that I can see how to do it within the website of the. OK. This book isn’t one of those of books. The writer don’t assume reader is a totally newbie. Because of that newbies sometimes can be lost in some chapters, but this exactly the way we all learn new technologies. I like the way Tyson introduces concepts about socket.io.

The book is focused in JavaScript and also uses JavaScript to the backend (with node). Maybe I miss the integration with non-JavaScript environments, but as socket.io is a javascript library I understand that the usage of JavaScript in all application lifecycle is a good approach.

IMG_20151106_204902_jpg

Also those days I was reading and playing a little bit with WebRTC and the book has one chapter about it! #cool

i18n AngularJS provider

There’s more than one way to perform i18n translations within our AngularJS projects. IMHO the best one is https://angular-translate.github.io/, but today I’m going to show you how I’m doing translations in my small AngularJS projects (normally Ionic projects).

I’ve packaged my custom solution and I also create one bower package ready to use via bower command line:

bower install ng-i8n --save

First we add our provider

<script src='lib/ng-i8n/dist/i8n.min.js'></script>

And now we add our new module (‘gonzalo123.i18n’) to our AngularJS project

angular.module('G', ['ionic', 'ngCordova', 'gonzalo123.i18n'])

Now we’re ready to initialise our provider with the default language and translation data

    .config(function (i18nProvider, Conf) {
        i18nProvider.init(Conf.defaultLang, Conf.lang);
    })

I like to use constants to store default lang and translation table, but it isn’t necessary. We can just pass the default language and Lang object to our provider

    .constant('Conf', {
        defaultLang: 'es',
        lang: {
            HI: {
                en: 'Hello',
                es: 'Hola'
            }
        }
    })

And that’s all. We can translate key in templates (the project also provides a filter):

<h1 class="title">{{ 'HI' | i18n }}</h1>

And also inside our controllers

    .controller('HomeController', function ($scope, i18n) {
        $scope.hi = i18n.traslate('HI');
    })

If we need to change user language, we only need to trigger ‘use’ function:

    .controller('HomeController', function ($scope, i18n) {
        $scope.changeLang = function(lang) {
            i18n.use(lang);
        };
    })

Here we can see the code of our provider:

(function () {
    "use strict";

    angular.module('gonzalo123.i8n', [])
        .provider('i18n', function () {
            var myLang = {},
                userLang = 'en',
                translate;

            translate = function (key) {
                if (myLang.hasOwnProperty(key)) {
                    return myLang[key][userLang] || key;
                } else {
                    return key;
                }
            };

            this.$get = function () {
                return {
                    use: this.use,
                    translate: translate
                };
            };

            this.use = function (lang) {
                userLang = lang;
            };

            this.init = function (lang, conf) {
                userLang = lang;
                myLang = conf;
            };
        })

        .filter('i18n', ['i18n', function (i18n) {
            var i18nFilter = function (key) {
                return i18n.translate(key);
            };

            i8nFilter.$stateful = true;

            return i18nFilter;
        }])
    ;
})();

Anyway the project is in my github account

PHP Dumper using Websockets

Another crazy idea. I want to dump my backend output in the browser’s console. There’re several PHP dumpers. For example Raul Fraile’s LadyBug. There’re also libraries to do exactly what I want to do, such as Chrome Logger. But I wanted to use Websockets and dump values in real time, without waiting to the end of backend script. Why? The answer is simple: Because I wanted to it:)

I’ve written several post about Websockets, Silex, PHP. In this case I’ll use a similar approach than the previous posts. First I’ve created a simple Webscocket server with socket.io. This server also starts a Express server to handle internal messages from the Silex Backend

var CONF = {
        IO: {HOST: '0.0.0.0', PORT: 8888},
        EXPRESS: {HOST: '0.0.0.0', PORT: 26300}
    },
    express = require('express'),
    expressApp = express(),
    server = require('http').Server(expressApp),
    io = require('socket.io')(server, {origins: 'localhost:*'})
    ;

expressApp.get('/:type/:session/:message', function (req, res) {
    console.log(req.params);
    var session = req.params.session,
        type = req.params.type,
        message = req.params.message;

    io.sockets.emit('dumper.' + session, {title: type, data: JSON.parse(message)});
    res.json('OK');
});

io.sockets.on('connection', function (socket) {
    console.log("Socket connected!");
});

expressApp.listen(CONF.EXPRESS.PORT, CONF.EXPRESS.HOST, function () {
    console.log('Express started');
});

server.listen(CONF.IO.PORT, CONF.IO.HOST, function () {
    console.log('IO started');
});

Now we create a simple Service provider to connect our Silex Backend to our Express server (and send the dumper’s messages using the websocket connection)

<?php

namespace Dumper\Silex\Provider;

use Silex\Application;
use Silex\ServiceProviderInterface;
use Dumper\Dumper;
use Silex\Provider\SessionServiceProvider;
use GuzzleHttp\Client;

class DumperServiceProvider implements ServiceProviderInterface
{
    private $wsConnector;
    private $client;

    public function __construct(Client $client, $wsConnector)
    {
        $this->client = $client;
        $this->wsConnector = $wsConnector;
    }

    public function register(Application $app)
    {
        $app->register(new SessionServiceProvider());

        $app['dumper'] = function () use ($app) {
            return new Dumper($this->client, $this->wsConnector, $app['session']->get('uid'));
        };

        $app['dumper.init'] = $app->protect(function ($uid) use ($app) {
            $app['session']->set('uid', $uid);
        });

        $app['dumper.uid'] = function () use ($app) {
            return $app['session']->get('uid');
        };
    }

    public function boot(Application $app)
    {
    }
}

Finally our Silex Application looks like that:

include __DIR__ . '/../vendor/autoload.php';

use Silex\Application;
use Silex\Provider\TwigServiceProvider;
use Dumper\Silex\Provider\DumperServiceProvider;
use GuzzleHttp\Client;

$app = new Application([
    'debug' => true
]);

$app->register(new DumperServiceProvider(new Client(), 'http://192.168.1.104:26300'));

$app->register(new TwigServiceProvider(), [
    'twig.path' => __DIR__ . '/../views',
]);

$app->get("/", function (Application $app) {
    $uid = uniqid();

    $app['dumper.init']($uid);

    return $app['twig']->render('index.twig', [
        'uid' => $uid
    ]);
});

$app->get('/api/hello', function (Application $app) {
    $app['dumper']->error("Hello world1");
    $app['dumper']->info([1,2,3]);

    return $app->json('OK');
});


$app->run();

In the client side we have one index.html. I’ve created Twig template to pass uid to the dumper object (the websocket channel to listen to), but we also can fetch this uid from the backend with one ajax call.

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head lang="en">
    <meta charset="UTF-8">
    <title>Dumper example</title>
</head>
<body>

<a href="#" onclick="api('hello')">hello</a>

<!-- We use jQuery just for the demo. Library doesn't need jQuery -->
<script src="assets/jquery/dist/jquery.min.js"></script>
<!-- We load the library -->
<script src="js/dumper.js"></script>

<script>
    dumper.startSocketIo('{{ uid }}', '//localhost:8888');
    function api(name) {
        // we perform a remote api ajax call that triggers websockets
        $.getJSON('/api/' + name, function (data) {
            // Doing nothing. We only call the api to test php dumper
        });
    }
</script>
</body>
</html>

I use jQuery to handle ajax request and to connect to the websocket dumper object (it doesn’t deppend on jQuery, only depend on socket.io)

var dumper = (function () {
    var socket, sessionUid, socketUri, init;

    init = function () {
        if (typeof(io) === 'undefined') {
            setTimeout(init, 100);
        } else {
            socket = io(socketUri);

            socket.on('dumper.' + sessionUid, function (data) {
                console.group('Dumper:', data.title);
                switch (data.title) {
                    case 'emergency':
                    case 'alert':
                    case 'critical':
                    case 'error':
                        console.error(data.data);
                        break;
                    case 'warning':
                        console.warn(data.data);
                        break;
                    case 'notice':
                    case 'info':
                    //case 'debug':
                        console.info(data.data);
                        break;
                    default:
                        console.log(data.data);
                }
                console.groupEnd();
            });
        }
    };

    return {
        startSocketIo: function (uid, uri) {
            var script = document.createElement('script');
            var node = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0];

            sessionUid = uid;
            socketUri = uri;
            script.src = socketUri + '/socket.io/socket.io.js';
            node.parentNode.insertBefore(script, node);

            init();
        }
    };
})();

Source code is available in my github account

Handling private states within AngularJS applications

One typical task when we work with AngularJs application is login, and private states. We can create different states in our application. Something like this:

    .config(function ($stateProvider, $urlRouterProvider) {
        $stateProvider
            .state('state1', {
                url: '/state1',
                templateUrl: templates/state1.html,
                controller: 'State1Controller'
            })
            .state('state2', {
                url: '/state2',
                templateUrl: templates/state2.html,
                controller: 'State2Controller'
            })
        $urlRouterProvider.otherwise('/state1');
    })

One way to create private states is using $stateChangeStart event. We can mark our private states with state parameters:

    .state('privateState1', {
            url: '/privateState1',
            templateUrl: templates/privateState1.html,
            controller: 'PrivateState1Controller',
            data: {
                isPublic: false
            }
        })

And then we can check out this parameters within $stateChangeStart event, doing one thing or another depending on token is present or not

    .run(function ($rootScope) {
        $rootScope.$on("$stateChangeStart", function (event, toState) {
            if (toState.data && toState.data.isPublic) {
                // do something here with localstorage and auth token
            }
        });
    })

This method works, but last days, reading one project of Aaron K Saunders at github, I just realised that there’s another method. We can listen to $stateChangeError. Let me show you how can we do it.

The idea is to use resolve in our private states. With resolve we can inject objects to our state’s controllers, for example user information. This method is triggered before call to the controller, so that’s a good place to check if token is present. If it isn’t, then we can raise an error. This error will trigger $stateChangeError event, and here we can redirect the user to login state.

It sounds good, but we need to write resolve parameter in every private states, and that’s bored. Especially when all states are private except login state. To by-pass this problem we can use abstract states. The idea is simple, we define one abstract state with “resolve” and then we create our private states under this abstract state.

Here we can see one example: login state isn’t private, but state1 and state2 are private, indeed.

    .config(function ($stateProvider, $urlRouterProvider) {
        .state('login', {
            url: '/login',
            templateUrl: 'templates/login.html',
            controller: 'LoginController'
        })
        .state('private', {
            url: "/private",
            abstract: true,
            template: '<ui-view/>',
            resolve: {
                user: function (UserService) {
                    return UserService.init();
                }
            }
        })
        .state('private.state1', {
            url: '/state1',
            templateUrl: 'templates/state1.html',
            controller: 'State1Controller'
        })
    
        .state('private.state2', {
            url: '/privateState2',
            templateUrl: 'templates/state2.html',
            controller: 'State2Controller'
        });
    
        $urlRouterProvider.otherwise('/private/privateState1');
    })

Our UserService is a AngularJS service. This service provides three methods: init (the method that raises an error if token isn’t present), login (to perform login and validate credentials), and logout (to remove token from localstorage and redirects to login state)

    .service('UserService', function ($q, $state) {
        var user = undefined;

        var UserService = {
            init: function () {
                var deferred = $q.defer();

                // do something here to get user from localstorage

                setTimeout(function () {
                    if (user) {
                        deferred.resolve(user);
                    } else {
                        deferred.reject({error: "noUser"});
                    }
                }, 100);

                return deferred.promise;
            },

            login: function (userName, password) {
                // validate user and password here
            },

            logout: function () {
                // remove token from localstorage
                user = undefined;
                $state.go('login', {});
            }
        };

        return UserService
    })

And finally the magic in $stateChangeError

    .run(function ($rootScope, $state) {
        $rootScope.$on('$stateChangeError',
            function (event, toState, toParams, fromState, fromParams, error) {
                if (error && error.error === "noUser") {
                    $state.go('login', {});
                }
            });
    })

And that’s all. IMHO this solution is cleaner than $stateChangeStart method. What do you think?

WARNING!
Before publishing this post I realize that this technique doesn’t work 100% correctly. Maybe is my implementation but I tried to use it with an ionic application and it doesn’t work with android. Something kinda weird. It works with web applications, it works with IOS, but it doesn’t work with Android. It looks like a bug (not sure about it). Blank screen instead of showing the template (but controller is loaded). We can see this anomalous situation using “ionic serve -l” (IOS ok and Android Not Ok)

To bypass this problem I tried a workaround. instead of using abstract states I create normal states, but to avoid to write again and again the resolve function to mark private states, I create a privateState provider

    .provider('privateState', function () {
        this.$get = function () {
            return {};
        };
    
        this.get = function(obj) {
            return angular.extend({
                resolve: {
                    user: function (UserService) {
                        return UserService.init();
                    }
                }
            }, obj);
        }
    })

Now I can easily create private states without writing ‘resolve’ function.

    .config(function ($stateProvider, $urlRouterProvider, privateStateProvider) {
        $urlRouterProvider.otherwise('/home');

        $stateProvider
            .state('home', privateStateProvider.get({
                url: '/home',
                templateUrl: 'templates/home.html',
                controller: 'HomeController'
            }))
        ;
    })

Building a AngularJS provider for hello.js library

This days I’ve been playing with hello.js. Hello is a A client-side Javascript SDK for authenticating with OAuth2 web services. It’s pretty straightforward to use and well explained at documentation. I want to use it within AngularJS projects. OK, I can include the library and use the global variable “hello”, but it isn’t cool. I want to create a reusable module and available with Bower. Let’s start.

Imagine one simple AngularJS application

(function () {
    angular.module('G', [])
        .config(function ($stateProvider, $urlRouterProvider) {
            $urlRouterProvider.otherwise("/");
            $stateProvider
                .state('login', {
                    url: "/",
                    templateUrl: "partials/home.html",
                    controller: "LoginController"
                })
                .state('home', {
                    url: "/login",
                    template: "partials/home.html"
                });
        })

        .controller('LoginController', function ($scope) {
            $scope.login = function () {
            };
        })
})();

Now we can include our references within our bower.json file

"dependencies": {
    "hello": "~1.4.1",
    "ng-hello": "*"
  }

and append those references to our index.html

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
    <meta charset="utf-8">
    <meta name="viewport" content="initial-scale=1, maximum-scale=1, user-scalable=no, width=device-width">
    <title>G</title>

    <script type="text/javascript" src="assets/hello/dist/hello.all.js"></script>
    <script type="text/javascript" src="assets/ng-hello/dist/ng-hello.js"></script>
    <script src="js/app.js"></script>
</head>
<body ng-app="G">
<div ui-view></div>

</body>
</html>

Our ng-hello is just a service provider that wraps hello.js

(function (hello) {
    angular.module('ngHello', [])
        .provider('hello', function () {
            this.$get = function () {
                return hello;
            };

            this.init = function (services, options) {
                hello.init(services, options);
            };
        });
})(hello);

That’s means that we configure the service in config callback and in our run callback we can set up events

(function () {
    angular.module('G', ['ngHello'])
        .config(function ($stateProvider, $urlRouterProvider, helloProvider) {
            helloProvider.init({
                twitter: 'myTwitterToken'
            });

            $urlRouterProvider.otherwise("/");
            $stateProvider
                .state('login', {
                    url: "/",
                    templateUrl: "partials/home.html",
                    controller: "LoginController"
                })
                .state('home', {
                    url: "/login",
                    template: "partials/home.html"
                });
        })

        .run(function ($ionicPlatform, $log, hello) {
            hello.on("auth.login", function (r) {
                $log.log(r.authResponse);
            });
        });
})();

And finally we can perform a twitter login within our controller

(function () {
    angular.module('G')
        .controller('LoginController', function ($scope, hello) {
            $scope.login = function () {
                hello('twitter').login();
            };
        })
    ;
})();

And that’s all. You can see the whole library in my github account here

Using OpenUI5 table and Angularjs

Last days I’ve been playing with OpenUI5. OpenUI5 is a web toolkit that SAP people has released as an open source project. I’ve read several good reviews about this framework, and because of that I started to hack a little bit with it. OpenUI5 came with a very complete set of controls. In this small example I want to use the “table” control. It’s just a datagrid. This days I playing a lot with Angular.js so I wanted to use together OpenUI5’s table control and Angularjs.

I’m not quite sure if it’s a good decision to use together both frameworks. In fact we don’t need Angular.js to create web applications using OpenUI5. OpenUI5 uses internally jQuery, but I wanted to hack a little bit and create one Angularjs directive to enclose one OpenUI5 datagrid.

First of all, we create one index.html. It’s just a boilerplate with angular + ui-router + ui-bootstrap. We also start our OpenUi5 environment with de default theme and including the table library

<!doctype html>
<html ng-app="G">
<head>
    <meta name="viewport" content="width=device-width, initial-scale=1">

    <link rel="stylesheet" href="assets/bootstrap/dist/css/bootstrap.min.css">

    <script src="assets/angular/angular.js"></script>
    <script src="assets/angular-ui-router/release/angular-ui-router.js"></script>
    <script src="assets/angular-bootstrap/ui-bootstrap-tpls.js"></script>

    <script id='sap-ui-bootstrap' type='text/javascript'
            src="https://openui5.hana.ondemand.com/resources/sap-ui-core.js"
            data-sap-ui-theme='sap_bluecrystal'
            data-sap-ui-libs='sap.ui.commons, sap.ui.table'></script>

    <script src="js/ngOpenUI5.js"></script>

    <script src="js/app.js"></script>
    <link rel="stylesheet" href="css/app.css">
</head>
<body class="ng-cloak">

<div class="container">

    <div class="starter-template">
        <div ui-view></div>
    </div>
</div>

<script src="assets/html5shiv/dist/html5shiv.js"></script>
<script src="assets/respond/dest/respond.src.js"></script>

</body>
</html>

Then we create a directive enclosing the OpenUI5 needed code within a Angular module

(function () {
    'use strict';

    angular.module('ng.openui5', [])
        .directive('openui5Table', function () {

            function renderColumns(columns, oTable) {
                for (var i = 0; i <= columns.length; i++) {
                    oTable.addColumn(new sap.ui.table.Column(columns[i]));
                }
            }

            var link = function (scope, element) {

                var oData = scope.model.data,
                    oTable = new sap.ui.table.Table(scope.model.conf),
                    oModel = new sap.ui.model.json.JSONModel();

                oModel.setData({modelData: oData});
                renderColumns(scope.model.columns, oTable);

                oTable.setModel(oModel);
                oTable.bindRows("/modelData");
                oTable.sort(oTable.getColumns()[0]);

                oTable.placeAt(element);

                scope.$watch('model.data', function (data) {
                    if (data) {
                        oModel.setData({modelData: data});
                        oModel.refresh();
                    }
                }, true);

            };

            return {
                restrict: 'E',
                scope: {model: '=ngModel'},
                link: link
            };
        });
}());

And now we can create a simple Angular.js using the ng.openui5 module. In this application we configure the table and fetch the data from an externar API server

(function () {
    'use strict';

    angular.module('G', ['ui.bootstrap', 'ui.router', 'ng.openui5'])

        .value('config', {
            apiUrl: '/api'
        })

        .config(function ($stateProvider, $urlRouterProvider) {
            $urlRouterProvider.otherwise("/");
            $stateProvider
                .state('home', {
                    url: "/",
                    templateUrl: "partials/home.html",
                    controller: 'HomeController'
                });
        })

        .controller('HomeController', function ($scope, $http, $log, config) {
            $scope.refresh = function () {
                $http.get(config.apiUrl + '/gridData').success(function (data) {
                    $scope.datagrid.data = data;
                });
            };

            $scope.datagrid = {
                conf: {
                    title: "Table example",
                    navigationMode: sap.ui.table.NavigationMode.Paginator
                },
                columns: [
                    {
                        label: new sap.ui.commons.Label({text: "Last Name"}),
                        template: new sap.ui.commons.TextView().bindProperty("text", "lastName"),
                        sortProperty: "lastName",
                        filterProperty: "lastName",
                        width: "200px"
                    }, {
                        label: new sap.ui.commons.Label({text: "First Name"}),
                        template: new sap.ui.commons.TextField().bindProperty("value", "name"),
                        sortProperty: "name",
                        filterProperty: "name",
                        width: "100px"
                    }, {
                        label: new sap.ui.commons.Label({text: "Checked"}),
                        template: new sap.ui.commons.CheckBox().bindProperty("checked", "checked"),
                        sortProperty: "checked",
                        filterProperty: "checked",
                        width: "75px",
                        hAlign: "Center"
                    }, {
                        label: new sap.ui.commons.Label({text: "Web Site"}),
                        template: new sap.ui.commons.Link().bindProperty("text", "linkText").bindProperty("href", "href"),
                        sortProperty: "linkText",
                        filterProperty: "linkText"
                    }, {
                        label: new sap.ui.commons.Label({text: "Image"}),
                        template: new sap.ui.commons.Image().bindProperty("src", "src"),
                        width: "75px",
                        hAlign: "Center"
                    }, {
                        label: new sap.ui.commons.Label({text: "Gender"}),
                        template: new sap.ui.commons.ComboBox({
                            items: [
                                new sap.ui.core.ListItem({text: "female"}),
                                new sap.ui.core.ListItem({text: "male"})
                            ]
                        }).bindProperty("value", "gender"),
                        sortProperty: "gender",
                        filterProperty: "gender"
                    }, {
                        label: new sap.ui.commons.Label({text: "Rating"}),
                        template: new sap.ui.commons.RatingIndicator().bindProperty("value", "rating"),
                        sortProperty: "rating",
                        filterProperty: "rating"
                    }

                ]
            };
        })
    ;
}());

The API server is a simple Silex server

<?php
include __DIR__ . '/../../vendor/autoload.php';
use Silex\Application;

$app = new Application();
$app->get("/", function (Application $app) {

$app->get('gridData', function (Application $app) {
    return $app->json([
        ['lastName' => uniqid(), 'name' => "Al", 'checked' => true, 'linkText' => "www.sap.com", 'href' => "http://www.sap.com", 'gender' => "male", 'rating' => 4, 'src' => "images/person1.gif"],
        ['lastName' => "Friese", 'name' => "Andy", 'checked' => true, 'linkText' => "www.sap.com", 'href' => "http://www.sap.com", 'gender' => "male", 'rating' => 2, 'src' => "images/person1.gif"],
        ['lastName' => "Mann", 'name' => "Anita", 'checked' => false, 'linkText' => "www.sap.com", 'href' => "http://www.sap.com", 'gender' => "female", 'rating' => 3, 'src' => "images/person1.gif"],
        ['lastName' => "Schutt", 'name' => "Doris", 'checked' => true, 'linkText' => "www.sap.com", 'href' => "http://www.sap.com", 'gender' => "female", 'rating' => 4, 'src' => "images/person1.gif"],
        ['lastName' => "Open", 'name' => "Doris", 'checked' => true, 'linkText' => "www.sap.com", 'href' => "http://www.sap.com", 'gender' => "female", 'rating' => 2, 'src' => "images/person1.gif"],
        ['lastName' => "Dewit", 'name' => "Kenya", 'checked' => false, 'linkText' => "www.sap.com", 'href' => "http://www.sap.com", 'gender' => "female", 'rating' => 3, 'src' => "images/person1.gif"],
        ['lastName' => "Zar", 'name' => "Lou", 'checked' => true, 'linkText' => "www.sap.com", 'href' => "http://www.sap.com", 'gender' => "male", 'rating' => 1, 'src' => "images/person1.gif"],
        ['lastName' => "Burr", 'name' => "Tim", 'checked' => true, 'linkText' => "www.sap.com", 'href' => "http://www.sap.com", 'gender' => "male", 'rating' => 2, 'src' => "images/person1.gif"],
        ['lastName' => "Hughes", 'name' => "Tish", 'checked' => true, 'linkText' => "www.sap.com", 'href' => "http://www.sap.com", 'gender' => "male", 'rating' => 5, 'src' => "images/person1.gif"],
        ['lastName' => "Lester", 'name' => "Mo", 'checked' => true, 'linkText' => "www.sap.com", 'href' => "http://www.sap.com", 'gender' => "male", 'rating' => 3, 'src' => "images/person1.gif"],
        ['lastName' => "Case", 'name' => "Justin", 'checked' => false, 'linkText' => "www.sap.com", 'href' => "http://www.sap.com", 'gender' => "male", 'rating' => 3, 'src' => "images/person1.gif"],
        ['lastName' => "Time", 'name' => "Justin", 'checked' => true, 'linkText' => "www.sap.com", 'href' => "http://www.sap.com", 'gender' => "male", 'rating' => 4, 'src' => "images/person1.gif"],
        ['lastName' => "Barr", 'name' => "Gaye", 'checked' => true, 'linkText' => "www.sap.com", 'href' => "http://www.sap.com", 'gender' => "male", 'rating' => 2, 'src' => "images/person1.gif"],
        ['lastName' => "Poole", 'name' => "Gene", 'checked' => true, 'linkText' => "www.sap.com", 'href' => "http://www.sap.com", 'gender' => "male", 'rating' => 1, 'src' => "images/person1.gif"],
        ['lastName' => "Ander", 'name' => "Corey", 'checked' => false, 'linkText' => "www.sap.com", 'href' => "http://www.sap.com", 'gender' => "male", 'rating' => 5, 'src' => "images/person1.gif"],
        ['lastName' => "Early", 'name' => "Brighton", 'checked' => true, 'linkText' => "www.sap.com", 'href' => "http://www.sap.com", 'gender' => "male", 'rating' => 3, 'src' => "images/person1.gif"],
        ['lastName' => "Noring", 'name' => "Constance", 'checked' => true, 'linkText' => "www.sap.com", 'href' => "http://www.sap.com", 'gender' => "female", 'rating' => 4, 'src' => "images/person1.gif"],
        ['lastName' => "Haas", 'name' => "Jack", 'checked' => true, 'linkText' => "www.sap.com", 'href' => "http://www.sap.com", 'gender' => "male", 'rating' => 2, 'src' => "images/person1.gif"],
        ['lastName' => "Tress", 'name' => "Matt", 'checked' => true, 'linkText' => "www.sap.com", 'href' => "http://www.sap.com", 'gender' => "male", 'rating' => 4, 'src' => "images/person1.gif"],
        ['lastName' => "Turner", 'name' => "Paige", 'checked' => true, 'linkText' => "www.sap.com", 'href' => "http://www.sap.com", 'gender' => "female", 'rating' => 3, 'src' => "images/person1.gif"]
    ]);
});
$app->run();

And basically that’s all. You can see the whole project within my github account.

working example

working example

Why did this year has passed so swiftly? My 2014 Retrospective.

Today an original post. Maybe I’m the only one doing this, I know. 2014 is close to finish and I want to review how it went the year. Let’s start.

The bad parts:

  • My book about SOLID principles (in Spanish) isn’t released yet. It’s almost finished. It only needs a few reviews, but because one thing or another it looks like it isn’t be released this year. Lesson learned: Those kind of side projects must have a release date. If they haven’t, another side projects can grab our attention and they can be frozen.
  • No new languages learned this year. There was a good chance with Swift. A new language, but it didn’t attract my attention. Erlang books are still in my desk and also my aim to improve my Java skills didn’t success. I found nothing where apply my Java learning.

The good parts:

  • Finally I can say JavaScript is a first class language within my personal software stack. Various projects with JS this year and I feel very comfortable writing JavaScript code. That’s also the year of Angular.js (for me and probably a lot of people).
  • This year has been the year of mobile development for me. I’ve been involved with several projects using Cordova/Phonegap framework. I the beginning to install Cordova environment, compile, deploy the application into the device was something “heroic” but now it turns into trivial operations. I still remember my beginning with jQuery Mobile. Horrible. Then I started using Angular.js and Topcoat. Much better, but still problems when switching between Android and IOs. Finally I re-discover Ionic framework. Incredible project. Hybrid applications with angular.js with very complete toolkit. This year has been crowed by push notifications, camera plugins, barcode scanners, token based authorisations, Websockets and things like that. Now hybrid applications with Phonegap/Cordova live in my comfort zone along with Silex, Angular, PHP… (that’s means I need to find other places outside it)
  • The last part of the year I’ve been working a lot with automation tools: Bower and Grunt mainly. I also started to work with JavaScript testing with Karma and Jasmine
  • This year I’ve been a proud speaker at DeSymfony Day in Barcelona. On incredible weekend. Meeting with colleagues, speaker dinner, great conversations, and tourism in a great city. Definitely the most beautiful room for a conference that I ever been
  • Katayunos The coding dojo where we play with TDD and Pair Programming is still alive. Maybe not as continuous as I’d like, but we still meet together 20-25 people one Saturday morning to improve our programming skill, from time to time
  • My personal blog is still alive too. It’s close to be 5 years old (OK, technically speaking 6, but first year it wasn’t a serious one). More than 20k views per month and sometimes close to 30k (Hey, thank you for reading!)

And that’s all. It was a good year. Hopefully it will be worse than 2015:)

See you!

Enclosing socket.io Websocket connection inside a HTML5 SharedWorker

I really like WebSockets. I’ve written several posts about them. Today we’re going to speak about something related to WebSockets. Let me explain it a little bit.

Imagine that we build a Web Application with WebSockets. That’s means that when we start the application, we need to connect to the WebSockets server. If our application is a Single-page application, we’ll create one socket per application, but: What happens if we open three tabs with the application within the browser? The answer is simple, we’ll create three sockets. Also, if we reload one tab (a full refresh) we’ll disconnect our socket and reconnect again. Maybe we can handle this situation, but we can easily bypass this disconnect-connect situation with a HTML5 feature called SharedWorkers.

Web Workers allows us to run JavaScript process in background. We also can create Shared Workers. SharedWorkers can be shared within our browser session. That’s means that we can enclose our WebSocket server inside s SharedWorker, and if we open various tabs with our browser we only need one Socket (one socket per session instead one socket per tab).

I’ve written a simple library called gio to perform this operation. gio uses socket.io to create WebSockets. WebWorker is a new HTML5 feature and it needs a modern browser. Socket.io works also with old browsers. It checks if WebWorkers are available and if they isn’t, then gio creates a WebSocket connection instead of using a WebWorker to enclose the WebSockets.

We can see one simple video to see how it works. In the video we can see how sockets are created. Only one socket is created even if we open more than one tab in our browser. But if we open a new session (one incognito session for example), a new socket is created

Here we can see the SharedWorker code:

"use strict";

importScripts('socket.io.js');

var socket = io(self.name),
    ports = [];

addEventListener('connect', function (event) {
    var port = event.ports[0];
    ports.push(port);
    port.start();

    port.addEventListener("message", function (event) {
        for (var i = 0; i < event.data.events.length; ++i) {
            var eventName = event.data.events[i];

            socket.on(event.data.events[i], function (e) {
                port.postMessage({type: eventName, message: e});
            });
        }
    });
});

socket.on('connect', function () {
    for (var i = 0; i < ports.length; i++) {
        ports[i].postMessage({type: '_connect'});
    }
});

socket.on('disconnect', function () {
    for (var i = 0; i < ports.length; i++) {
        ports[i].postMessage({type: '_disconnect'});
    }
});

And here we can see the gio source code:

var gio = function (uri, onConnect, onDisConnect) {
    "use strict";
    var worker, onError, workerUri, events = {};

    function getKeys(obj) {
        var keys = [];

        for (var i in obj) {
            if (obj.hasOwnProperty(i)) {
                keys.push(i);
            }
        }

        return keys;
    }

    function onMessage(type, message) {
        switch (type) {
            case '_connect':
                if (onConnect) onConnect();
                break;
            case '_disconnect':
                if (onDisConnect) onDisConnect();
                break;
            default:
                if (events[type]) events[type](message);
        }
    }

    function startWorker() {
        worker = new SharedWorker(workerUri, uri);
        worker.port.addEventListener("message", function (event) {
            onMessage(event.data.type, event.data.message);

        }, false);

        worker.onerror = function (evt) {
            if (onError) onError(evt);
        };

        worker.port.start();
        worker.port.postMessage({events: getKeys(events)});
    }

    function startSocketIo() {
        var socket = io(uri);
        socket.on('connect', function () {
            if (onConnect) onConnect();
        });

        socket.on('disconnect', function () {
            if (onDisConnect) onDisConnect();
        });

        for (var eventName in events) {
            if (events.hasOwnProperty(eventName)) {
                socket.on(eventName, socketOnEventHandler(eventName));
            }
        }
    }

    function socketOnEventHandler(eventName) {
        return function (e) {
            onMessage(eventName, e);
        };
    }

    return {
        registerEvent: function (eventName, callback) {
            events[eventName] = callback;
        },

        start: function () {
            if (!SharedWorker) {
                startSocketIo();
            } else {
                startWorker();
            }
        },

        onError: function (cbk) {
            onError = cbk;
        },

        setWorker: function (uri) {
            workerUri = uri;
        }
    };
};

And here the application code:

(function (gio) {
    "use strict";

    var onConnect = function () {
        console.log("connected!");
    };

    var onDisConnect = function () {
        console.log("disconnect!");
    };

    var ws = gio("http://localhost:8080", onConnect, onDisConnect);
    ws.setWorker("sharedWorker.js");

    ws.registerEvent("message", function (data) {
        console.log("message", data);
    });

    ws.onError(function (data) {
        console.log("error", data);
    });

    ws.start();
}(gio));

I’ve also created a simple webSocket server with socket.io. In this small server there’s a setInterval function broadcasting one message to all clients per second to see the application working

var io, connectedSockets;

io = require('socket.io').listen(8080);
connectedSockets = 0;

io.sockets.on('connection', function (socket) {
    connectedSockets++;
    console.log("Socket connected! Conected sockets:", connectedSockets);

    socket.on('disconnect', function () {
        connectedSockets--;
        console.log("Socket disconnect! Conected sockets:", connectedSockets);
    });
});

setInterval(function() {
    io.emit("message", "Hola " + new Date().getTime());
}, 1000); 

Source code is available in my github account.

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