Blog Archives

Alternative way to inject providers in a Silex application

I normally use Silex when I need to build one Backend. It’s simple and straightforward to build one API endpoint using this micro framework. But there’s something that I don’t like it: The “array access” way to access to the dependency injection container. I need to remember what kind of object provides my service provider and also my IDE doesn’t help me with autocompletion. OK I can use PHPDoc comments or even create one class that inherits from Silex\Application and use Traits. Normally I’m lazy to do it. Because of that I’ve create this simple service provider to help me to do what I’m looking for. Let me explain it a little bit.

Imagine that I’ve got this class

namespace Foo

class Math
{
    public function sum($i, $j)
    {
        return $i+$j;
    }
}

And I want to add this service to my DIC

$app['math'] = $app->share(function () {
    return new Math();
});

Now I can use my service within my Silex application

$app->get("/", function () use ($app) {
    return $app['math']->sum(1, 2);
});

But I want to use my service in the same way that I’m using my services within my AngularJS applications. I what to do something like that:

use Foo\Math;
...
$app->get("/", function (Math $math) {
    return $math->sum(1, 2);
});

And that’s exactly what my service provider does. I only need to append my provider to my Application and tell to the provider what’s the relationship between Pimple’s services keys and its provided Instance

$app->register(new InjectorServiceProvider([
    'Foo\Math' => 'math',
]));

This is one example

composer require gonzalo123/injector
include __DIR__ . "/../vendor/autoload.php";

use Silex\Application;
use Injector\InjectorServiceProvider;
use Foo\Math;

$app            = new Application(['debug' => true]);

$app->register(new InjectorServiceProvider([
    'Foo\Math' => 'math',
]));

$app['math'] = function () {
    return new Math();
};

$app->get("/", function (Math $math) {
    return $math->sum(1, 2);
});

$app->run();

And this is the Service Provider

namespace Injector;
use Silex\Application;
use Silex\ServiceProviderInterface;
use Symfony\Component\HttpKernel\Event\FilterControllerEvent;
use Symfony\Component\HttpKernel\KernelEvents;
class InjectorServiceProvider implements ServiceProviderInterface
{
    private $injectables;
    public function __construct($injectables = [])
    {
        $this->injectables = $injectables;
    }
    public function appendInjectables($providedClass, $key)
    {
        $this->injectables[$providedClass] = $key;
    }
    public function register(Application $app)
    {
        $app->on(KernelEvents::CONTROLLER, function (FilterControllerEvent $event) use ($app) {
            $reflectionFunction = new \ReflectionFunction($event->getController());
            $parameters         = $reflectionFunction->getParameters();
            foreach ($parameters as $param) {
                $class = $param->getClass();
                if ($class && array_key_exists($class->name, $this->injectables)) {
                    $event->getRequest()->attributes->set($param->name, $app[$this->injectables[$class->name]]);
                }
            }
        });
    }
    public function boot(Application $app)
    {
    }
}

As we can see I’m listening to CONTROLLER event from event dispatcher and I inject the dependency form container to requests attributes.

Full code in my github account

Building a Pimple/Container from a YAML file

The last May I attended to the great deSymfony day conference in Barcelona. At speaker’s dinner I had a great conversation with Máximo Cuadros about Dependency Injection Containers. We discuss about the customisation of containers. I said that I prefer Symfony´s DIC instead of Pimple, mainly because its configuration with YAML (or even xml) files. But In fact we can customise Pimple/Containers with YAML files in a similar way than we do it with Symfony’s DIC. In this example we’re going to see one way to do it.

We can easily extend the Pimple/Container and add a function to load a YAML files, parse them and build the container. But doing this we’re violating various SOLID principles. First we’re violating the Open-Close principle, because to extend our Pimple/Container with the new functionality we are adding new code within an existing class. We’re also violating the Dependency Inversion Principle and our new Pimple/Container is going to be harder to maintain. And finally we’re obviously violating the Single Responsibility Principle, because our new Pimple/Container is not only a DIC, it’s also a YAML parser.

There’s another way to perform this operation without upsetting SOLID principles. We can use the Symfony’s Config component

The idea is simple. Imagine this simple application:

use Pimple\Container;

$container = new Container();
$container['name'] = 'Gonzalo';

$container['Curl'] = function () {
    return new Curl();
};
$container['Proxy'] = function ($c) {
    return new Proxy($c['Curl']);
};

$container['App'] = function ($c) {
    return new App($c['Proxy'], $c['name']);
};

$app = $container['App'];
echo $app->hello();

We define the dependencies with code. But we want to define dependencies using a yml file for example:

parameters:
  name: Gonzalo

services:
  App:
    class:     App
    arguments: [@Proxy, %name%]
  Proxy:
    class:     Proxy
    arguments: [@Curl]
  Curl:
    class:     Curl

As we can see we’re using a similar syntax than Symfony’s DIC YAML files.
Now, with our new library we can use the following code:

use Pimple\Container;
use G\Yaml2Pimple\ContainerBuilder;
use G\Yaml2Pimple\YamlFileLoader;
use Symfony\Component\Config\FileLocator;

$container = new Container();

$builder = new ContainerBuilder($container);
$locator = new FileLocator(__DIR__);
$loader = new YamlFileLoader($builder, $locator);
$loader->load('services.yml');

$app = $container['App'];
echo $app->hello();

Now our Pimple/Container is just a Pimple/Container nothing more. It doesn’t know anything about yaml, parsers and thing like that. It’s doesn’t have any extra responsibility. The responsibility of the parser falls on YamlFileLoader
You can see the library in my github account. It’s but one usage example of Symfony’s Config component. It only allows Yaml files, but it can be extended with Xml files adding a XmlFileLoader.

Auto injecting dependencies in PHP objects

I must admit I don’t really know what’s the correct title for this post. Finally I use “Auto injecting dependencies in PHP objects”. I know it isn’t very descriptive. Let me explain it a little bit. This time I want to automate the Hollywood Principle (“Don’t call us, we’ll call you”). The idea is simple. Imagine one “controller”

class Controller
{
    public function hi($name)
    {
        return "Hi $name";
    }
}

We can easily automate the “hi” action

$controller = new Controller();
echo $controller->hi("Gonzalo");

Or maybe if we are building a framework and our class name and action name depends on user-input:

$class = "Controller";
$action = "hi";
$arguments = ['name' => "Gonzalo"];

echo call_user_function_array([new $class, $action], arguments);

But imagine that we want to allow something like that:

class Controller
{
    public function hi($name, Request $request)
    {
        return "Hi $name " .$request->get('surname');
    }
}

Now we need to inject Request object within our action “hi”, but not always. Only when user set a input variable with the type “Request”. Imagine that we also want to allow this kind of injection in the constructor too. We can need to use Reflection to create our instance and to call our action. Sometimes I need to work with custom frameworks and legacy PHP applications. I’ve done it in a couple of projects, but now I want to create a library to automate this operation.

The idea is to use a Dependency Injection Container (Pimple in my example) and retrieve the dependency from container (if it’s available). I cannot use “new” keyword to create the instance and also I cannot call directly the action.

One usage example is:

class Foo
{
    public function hi($name)
    {
        return "Hi $name";
    }
}

class Another
{
    public function bye($name)
    {
        return "Bye $name";
    }
}

class Bar
{
    private $foo;

    public function __construct(Foo $foo, $surname = null)
    {
        $this->foo     = $foo;
        $this->surname = $surname;
    }

    public function hi(Another $another, $name)
    {
        return $this->foo->hi($name . " " . $this->surname) . ' ' . $another->bye($name);
    }
}

$container = new Pimple();
$container['name'] = "Gonzalo2";

$builder = new G\Builder($container);

$bar = $builder->create('Bar', ['surname' => 'Ayuso']);
var_dump($builder->call([$bar, 'hi']));

var_dump($bar->hi(new Another(), 'xxxxx'));

Our library tries to retrieve the dependecy from the DIC. If it cannot do it, it creates the a new instance.
The whole “magic” is in the Builder class. You can see the library in my github account.