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Control humidity with a Raspberry Pi and IoT devices

I’ve got a Wemo switch and a BeeWi temperature/humidity sensor. I’ve use them in previous projects. Today I want a control humidity level in a room. The idea is switch on/off a dehumidifier (plugged to Wemo switch) depending on the humidity (from BeeWi sensor). Let’s start.

I’ve got one script (node) that reads humidity from the sensor (via BTLE)

#!/usr/bin/env node
noble = require('noble');

var status = false;
var address = process.argv[2];

if (!address) {
    console.log('Usage "./reader.py <sensor mac address>"');
    process.exit();
}

function hexToInt(hex) {
    var num, maxVal;
    if (hex.length % 2 !== 0) {
        hex = "0" + hex;
    }
    num = parseInt(hex, 16);
    maxVal = Math.pow(2, hex.length / 2 * 8);
    if (num > maxVal / 2 - 1) {
        num = num - maxVal;
    }

    return num;
}

noble.on('stateChange', function(state) {
    status = (state === 'poweredOn');
});

noble.on('discover', function(peripheral) {
    if (peripheral.address == address) {
        var data = peripheral.advertisement.manufacturerData.toString('hex');
        console.log(Math.min(100,parseInt(data.substr(14, 2),16)));
        noble.stopScanning();
        process.exit();
    }
});

noble.on('scanStop', function() {
    noble.stopScanning();
});

setTimeout(function() {
    noble.stopScanning();
    noble.startScanning();
}, 3000);

Now I’ve got another script to control the switch. A Python script using ouimeaux library

#!/usr/bin/env python
from ouimeaux.environment import Environment
from subprocess import check_output
import sys
import os

threshold = 3

def action(switch):
    humidity = int(check_output(["%s/reader.js" % os.path.dirname(sys.argv[0]), sensorMac]))
    if "Switch1" == switch.name:
        botton = expected - threshold
        isOn = False if switch.get_state() == 0 else True
        log = ""

        if isOn and humidity < botton:
            switch.basicevent.SetBinaryState(BinaryState=0)
            log = "humidity < %s Switch to OFF" % botton
        elif not isOn and humidity > expected:
            switch.basicevent.SetBinaryState(BinaryState=1)
            log = "humidity > %s Switch to ON" % expected

        print "Humidity: %s Switch is OK (%s) %s" % (humidity, 'On' if isOn else 'Off', log)

if __name__ == '__main__':
    try:
        sensorMac = sys.argv[1]
        mySwitch = sys.argv[2]
        expected = int(sys.argv[3])
    except:
        print 'Usage "./dehumidifier.py <sensorMac> <switch name> <expected humidity>"'
        sys.exit()

    env = Environment(action)
    env.start()
    env.discover(seconds=3)

And that’s all. Now I only need to configure my Raspberry Pi’s crontab and run the script each minute

*/1 * * * *     /mnt/media/projects/hum/dehumidifier.py ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff Switch1 50

Project is available in my github account.

Nowadays I’m involved with Arduino and iot, so I wand to do something similar with cheaper Arduino stuff.

Playing with arduino, IoT, crossbar and websockets

Yes. Finally I’ve got an arduino board. It’s time to hack a little bit. Today I want to try different things. I want to display in a webpage one value from my arduino board. For example one analog data using a potentiometer. Let’s start.

We are going to use one potentiometer. A potentiometer is a resistor with a rotating contact that forms an adjustable voltage divider. It has three pins. If we connect one pin to 5V power source of our arduino, another one to the ground and another to one A0 (analog input 0), we can read different values depending on the position of potentiometer’s rotating contact.

arduino_analog

Arduino has 10 bit analog resolution. That means 1024 possible values, from 0 to 1023. So when our potentiometer gives us 5 volts we’ll obtain 1024 and when our it gives us 0V we’ll read 0. Here we can see a simple arduino program to read this analog input and send data via serial port:

int mem;

void setup() {
  Serial.begin(9600);
}

void loop() {
  int value = analogRead(A0);
  if (value != mem) {
    Serial.println(value);
  }
  mem = value;

  delay(100);
}

This program is simple loop with a delay of 100 milliseconds that reads A0 and if value is different than previously read (to avoid sending the same value when nobody is touching the potentiometer) we send the value via serial port (with 9600 bauds)

We can test our program using the serial monitor of our arduino IDE our using another serial monitor.

Now we’re going to create one script to read this serial port data. We’re going to use Python. I’ll use my laptop and my serial port is /dev/tty.usbmodem14231

import serial

arduino = serial.Serial('/dev/tty.usbmodem14231', 9600)

while 1:
  print arduino.readline().strip()

Basically we’ve got our backend running. Now we can create a simple frontend.

...
<div id='display'></div>
...

We’ll need websockets. I normally use socket.io but today I’ll use Crossbar.io. Since I hear about it in a Ronny’s talk at deSymfony conference I wanted to use it.

I’ll change a little bit our backend to emit one event

import serial
from os import environ
from twisted.internet.defer import inlineCallbacks
from twisted.internet.task import LoopingCall
from autobahn.twisted.wamp import ApplicationSession, ApplicationRunner

arduino = serial.Serial('/dev/tty.usbmodem14231', 9600)

class SeriaReader(ApplicationSession):
    @inlineCallbacks
    def onJoin(self, details):
        def publish():
            return self.publish(u'iot.serial.reader', arduino.readline().strip())

        yield LoopingCall(publish).start(0.1)

if __name__ == '__main__':
    runner = ApplicationRunner(environ.get("GONZALO_ROUTER", u"ws://127.0.0.1:8080/ws"), u"iot")
    runner.run(SeriaReader)

Now I only need to create a crossbar.io server. I will use node to do it

var autobahn = require('autobahn'),
    connection = new autobahn.Connection({
            url: 'ws://0.0.0.0:8080/ws',
            realm: 'iot'
        }
    );

connection.open();

And now we only need to connect our frontend to the websocket server

$(function () {
    var connection = new autobahn.Connection({
        url: "ws://192.168.1.104:8080/ws",
        realm: "iot"
    });

    connection.onopen = function (session) {
        session.subscribe('iot.serial.reader', function (args) {
            $('#display').html(args[0]);
        });
    };

    connection.open();
});

It works but thre’s a problem. The first time we connect with our browser we won’t see the display value until we change the position of the potentiometer. That’s because ‘iot.serial.reader’ event is only emitted when potentiometer changes. No change means no new value. To solve this problem we only need to change a little bit our crossbar.io server. We’ll “memorize” the last value and we’ll expose one method ‘iot.serial.get’ to ask about this value

var autobahn = require('autobahn'),
    connection = new autobahn.Connection({
            url: 'ws://0.0.0.0:8080/ws',
            realm: 'iot'
        }
    ),
    mem;

connection.onopen = function (session) {
    session.register('iot.serial.get', function () {
        return mem;
    });

    session.subscribe('iot.serial.reader', function (args) {
        mem = args[0];
    });
};

connection.open();

An now in the frontend we ask for ‘iot.serial.get’ when we connect to the socket

$(function () {
    var connection = new autobahn.Connection({
        url: "ws://192.168.1.104:8080/ws",
        realm: "iot"
    });

    connection.onopen = function (session) {
        session.subscribe('iot.serial.reader', function (args) {
            $('#display').html(args[0]);
        }).then(function () {
                session.call('iot.serial.get').then(
                    function (result) {
                        $('#display').htmlresult);
                    }
                );
            }
        );
    };
    connection.open();
});

And thats all. The source code is available in my github account. You also can see a demo of the working prototype here

Smart bulb controlled from a Raspberry Pi with Python. My RGB alarm clock

I’ve got a BeeWi Smart LED Color Bulb. I must admit I cannot resist to buy those kind of devices :).

I can switch on/off the bulb and change the color using its Mobile App, but it’s not fun. I want to play a little bit with the bulb. My idea is the following one: First switch on the bulb in the mornint and set up the bulb color (Blue for example). Then change bulb color depending on my morning routine. And finally switch the bulb off. Now with this bulb’s color I know if my morning routine is on-time, just looking at the bulb’s color. For example if the bulb is red and I’m still having breakfast probably I’m late.

The prototype is very simple. The bulb has a bluetooth interface and I’ve found a python script to control the bulb. I’ve changed a little bit this script to adapt it to my needs.

Now I only need to set up the crontab within my Raspberry Pi to trigger the script and switch on/off the bulb and change the RGB color.

for example:

# switch on the bulb
/usr/bin/python /mnt/media/projects/iot/bulb.py /mnt/media/projects/iot/conf.json on
# set bulb's color to green
/usr/bin/python /mnt/media/projects/iot/bulb.py /mnt/media/projects/iot/conf.json colour 999900

In another post we play with Telegram bots to read temperature. Now I’ve adapted also my bot to switch on/off and change color of the bulb.

Now I’ve got another toy in my desk. One arduino board. I’m sure I will enjoy a lot 🙂

Home automation pet project. Playing with IoT, temperature sensors, fans and Telegram bots

Summer holidays are over. Besides my bush walks I’ve been also hacking a little bit with one idea that I had in mind. Summer means high temperatures and I wanted to control my fan. For example turn on the fan when temperature is over a threshold. I can do it using an Arduino board and a temperature sensor, but I don’t have the one Arduino board. I have several devices. For example a Wemo switch. With this device connected to my Wifi network I can switch on and off my fan remotely from my mobile phone (using its android app) or even from my Pebble watch using the API. I also have a BeeWi temperature/humidity sensor. It’s a BTLE device. It comes with its own app for android, but there’s also a API. Yes. I known that one Arduino board with a couple of sensors can be cheaper than one of this devices, but when I’m a shop and I’ve got one of this devices in my hands I cannot resist.

I also have a new Raspberry pi 3. I’ve recently upgraded my home multimedia server from a rpi2 to the new rpi3. Basically I use it as multimedia server and now also as retro console. This new rpi3 has Bluetooth so I wanted to do something with it. Read temperature from the Bluetooth sensor sounds good so I started to hack a little bit.

I found this post. I started working with Python. The script almost works but it uses Bluetooth connection and as someone said in the comments it uses a lot of battery. So I switched to a BTLE version. I found a simple node library to connect BTLE devices called noble, really simple to use. In one afternoon I had one small script ready. The idea was put this script in my RP3’s crontab, and scan the temperature each minute (via noble) and if the temperature was over a threshold switch on the wemo device (via ouimeaux). I also wanted to be informed when my fan is switch on and off. The most easier way to do it was via Telegram (I already knew telebot library).

var noble = require('noble'),
    Wemo = require('wemo-client'),
    TeleBot = require('telebot'),
    fs = require('fs'),
    beeWiData,
    wemo,
    threshold,
    address,
    bot,
    chatId,
    wemoDevice,
    configuration,
    confPath;

if (process.argv.length <= 2) {
    console.log("Usage: " + __filename + " conf.json");
    process.exit(-1);
}

confPath = process.argv[2];
try {
    configuration = JSON.parse(
        fs.readFileSync(process.argv[2])
    );
} catch (e) {
    console.log("configuration file not valid");
    process.exit(-1);
}

bot = new TeleBot(configuration.telegramBotAPIKey);
address = configuration.beeWiAddress;
threshold = configuration.threshold;
wemoDevice = configuration.wemoDevice;
chatId = configuration.telegramChatId;

function persists() {
    configuration.beeWiData = beeWiData;
    fs.writeFileSync(confPath, JSON.stringify(configuration));
}

function setSwitchState(state, callback) {
    wemo = new Wemo();
    wemo.discover(function(deviceInfo) {
        if (deviceInfo.friendlyName == wemoDevice) {
            console.log("device found:", deviceInfo.friendlyName, "setting the state to", state);
            var client = wemo.client(deviceInfo);
            client.on('binaryState', function(value) {
                callback();
            });

            client.on('statusChange', function(a) {
                console.log("statusChange", a);
            });
            client.setBinaryState(state);
        }
    });
}

beeWiData = {temperature: undefined, humidity: undefined, batery: undefined};

function hexToInt(hex) {
    if (hex.length % 2 !== 0) {
        hex = "0" + hex;
    }
    var num = parseInt(hex, 16);
    var maxVal = Math.pow(2, hex.length / 2 * 8);
    if (num > maxVal / 2 - 1) {
        num = num - maxVal;
    }
    return num;
}

noble.on('stateChange', function(state) {
    if (state === 'poweredOn') {
        noble.stopScanning();
        noble.startScanning();
    } else {
        noble.stopScanning();
    }
});

noble.on('scanStop', function() {
    var message, state;
    if (beeWiData.temperature > threshold) {
        state = 1;
        message = "temperature (" + beeWiData.temperature + ") over threshold (" + threshold + "). Fan ON. Humidity: " + beeWiData.humidity;
    } else {
        message = "temperature (" + beeWiData.temperature + ") under threshold (" + threshold + "). Fan OFF. Humidity: " + beeWiData.humidity;
        state = 0;
    }
    setSwitchState(state, function() {
        if (configuration.beeWiData.hasOwnProperty('temperature') && configuration.beeWiData.temperature < threshold && state === 1 || configuration.beeWiData.temperature > threshold && state === 0) {
            console.log("Notify to telegram bot", message);
            bot.sendMessage(chatId, message).then(function() {
                process.exit(0);
            }, function(e) {
                console.error(e);
                process.exit(0);
            });
            persists();
        } else {
            console.log(message);
            persists();
            process.exit(0);
        }
    });
});

noble.on('discover', function(peripheral) {
    if (peripheral.address == address) {
        var data = peripheral.advertisement.manufacturerData.toString('hex');
        beeWiData.temperature = parseFloat(hexToInt(data.substr(10, 2)+data.substr(8, 2))/10).toFixed(1);
        beeWiData.humidity = Math.min(100,parseInt(data.substr(14, 2),16));
        beeWiData.batery = parseInt(data.substr(24, 2),16);
        beeWiData.date = new Date();
        noble.stopScanning();
    }
});

setTimeout(function() {
    console.error("timeout exceded!");
    process.exit(0);
}, 5000);

The script is here.

It works but I wanted to keep on hacking. One Sunday morning I read this post. I don’t have an amazon button, but I wanted to do something similar. I started to play with scapy library sniffing ARP packets in my home network. I realize that I can detect when my Kindle connects to the network, my tv, or even my mobile phone. Then I had one I idea: Detect when my mobile phone connects to my wifi. My mobile phone connects to my wifi before I enter in my house so my idea was simple: Detect when I’m close to my home’s door and send me a telegram message saying “Wellcome home” in addition to the temperature inside my house at this moment.

#!/usr/bin/env python

import sys
from scapy.all import *
import telebot
import gearman
import json
from StringIO import StringIO

BUFFER_SIZE = 1024

try:
    with open(sys.argv[1]) as data_file:
        data = json.load(data_file)
        myPhone = data['myPhone']
        routerIP = data['routerIP']
        TOKEN = data['telegramBotAPIKey']
        chatID = data['telegramChatId']
        gearmanServer = data['gearmanServer']
except:
    print("Unexpected error:", sys.exc_info()[0])
    raise

def getSensorData():
    gm_client = gearman.GearmanClient([gearmanServer])
    completed_job_request = gm_client.submit_job("temp", '')
    io = StringIO(completed_job_request.result)

    return json.load(io)

tb = telebot.TeleBot(TOKEN)

def arp_display(pkt):
    if pkt[ARP].op == 1 and pkt[ARP].hwsrc == myPhone and pkt[ARP].pdst == routerIP:
        sensorData = getSensorData()
        message = "Wellcome home Gonzalo! Temperature: %s humidity: %s" % (sensorData['temperature'], sensorData['humidity'])
        tb.send_message(chatID, message)
        print message

print sniff(prn=arp_display, filter='arp', store=0)

I have one node script to read temperature and one Python script to sniff my network. I can find how to read temperature from Python and use only one script but I was lazy (remember that I was on holiday) so I turned the node script that reads temperature into a gearman worker.

var noble = require('noble'),
    fs = require('fs'),
    Gearman = require('node-gearman'),
    beeWiData,
    address,
    bot,
    configuration,
    confPath,
    status,
    callback;

var gearman = new Gearman();

if (process.argv.length <= 2) {
    console.log("Usage: " + __filename + " conf.json");
    process.exit(-1);
}

confPath = process.argv[2];
try {
    configuration = JSON.parse(
        fs.readFileSync(process.argv[2])
    );
} catch (e) {
    console.log("configuration file not valid", e);
    process.exit(-1);
}

address = configuration.beeWiAddress;
delay = configuration.tempServerDelayMinutes * 60 * 1000;
tcpPort = configuration.tempServerPort;

beeWiData = {};

function hexToInt(hex) {
    if (hex.length % 2 !== 0) {
        hex = "0" + hex;
    }
    var num = parseInt(hex, 16);
    var maxVal = Math.pow(2, hex.length / 2 * 8);
    if (num > maxVal / 2 - 1) {
        num = num - maxVal;
    }
    return num;
}

noble.on('stateChange', function(state) {
    if (state === 'poweredOn') {
        console.log("stateChange:poweredOn");
        status = true;
    } else {
        status = false;
    }
});

noble.on('discover', function(peripheral) {
    if (peripheral.address == address) {
        var data = peripheral.advertisement.manufacturerData.toString('hex');
        beeWiData.temperature = parseFloat(hexToInt(data.substr(10, 2)+data.substr(8, 2))/10).toFixed(1);
        beeWiData.humidity = Math.min(100,parseInt(data.substr(14, 2),16));
        beeWiData.batery = parseInt(data.substr(24, 2),16);
        beeWiData.date = new Date();
        noble.stopScanning();
    }
});

noble.on('scanStop', function() {
    console.log(beeWiData);
    noble.stopScanning();
    callback();
});

var worker;

function workerCallback(payload, worker) {
    callback = function() {
        worker.end(JSON.stringify(beeWiData));
    }

    beeWiData = {temperature: undefined, humidity: undefined, batery: undefined};

    if (status) {
        noble.stopScanning();
        noble.startScanning();
    } else {
        setInterval(function() {
            workerCallback(payload, worker);
        }, 1000);
    }
}

gearman.registerWorker("temp", workerCallback);

Now I only need to call this worker from my Python sniffer and thats all.

I wanted to play a little bit. I also wanted to ask the temperature on demand. Since I was using Telegram I had an idea. Create a Telegram bot running in my RP3. And that’s my summer pet project. Basically it has three parts:

worker.js
It’s a gearman worker. It reads temperature and humidity from my BeeWi sensor via BTLE

bot.py
It’s a Telegram bot with the following commands available:

/switchInfo: get switch info
/switchOFF: switch OFF the switch
/help: Gives you information about the available commands
/temp: Get temperature
/switchON: switch ON the switch

sniff.py
It’s just a ARP sniffer. It detects when I’m close to my home and sends me a message via Telegram with the temperature. It detects when my mobile phone sends a ARP package to my router (aka when I connect to my Wifi). It happens before I enter in my house, so the Telegram message arrives before I put the key in the door 🙂

I run al my scripts in my Raspberry Pi3. To ensure all scripts are up an running I use supervisor

All the scripts are available in my github account