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Home automation pet project. Playing with IoT, temperature sensors, fans and Telegram bots

Summer holidays are over. Besides my bush walks I’ve been also hacking a little bit with one idea that I had in mind. Summer means high temperatures and I wanted to control my fan. For example turn on the fan when temperature is over a threshold. I can do it using an Arduino board and a temperature sensor, but I don’t have the one Arduino board. I have several devices. For example a Wemo switch. With this device connected to my Wifi network I can switch on and off my fan remotely from my mobile phone (using its android app) or even from my Pebble watch using the API. I also have a BeeWi temperature/humidity sensor. It’s a BTLE device. It comes with its own app for android, but there’s also a API. Yes. I known that one Arduino board with a couple of sensors can be cheaper than one of this devices, but when I’m a shop and I’ve got one of this devices in my hands I cannot resist.

I also have a new Raspberry pi 3. I’ve recently upgraded my home multimedia server from a rpi2 to the new rpi3. Basically I use it as multimedia server and now also as retro console. This new rpi3 has Bluetooth so I wanted to do something with it. Read temperature from the Bluetooth sensor sounds good so I started to hack a little bit.

I found this post. I started working with Python. The script almost works but it uses Bluetooth connection and as someone said in the comments it uses a lot of battery. So I switched to a BTLE version. I found a simple node library to connect BTLE devices called noble, really simple to use. In one afternoon I had one small script ready. The idea was put this script in my RP3’s crontab, and scan the temperature each minute (via noble) and if the temperature was over a threshold switch on the wemo device (via ouimeaux). I also wanted to be informed when my fan is switch on and off. The most easier way to do it was via Telegram (I already knew telebot library).

var noble = require('noble'),
    Wemo = require('wemo-client'),
    TeleBot = require('telebot'),
    fs = require('fs'),
    beeWiData,
    wemo,
    threshold,
    address,
    bot,
    chatId,
    wemoDevice,
    configuration,
    confPath;

if (process.argv.length <= 2) {
    console.log("Usage: " + __filename + " conf.json");
    process.exit(-1);
}

confPath = process.argv[2];
try {
    configuration = JSON.parse(
        fs.readFileSync(process.argv[2])
    );
} catch (e) {
    console.log("configuration file not valid");
    process.exit(-1);
}

bot = new TeleBot(configuration.telegramBotAPIKey);
address = configuration.beeWiAddress;
threshold = configuration.threshold;
wemoDevice = configuration.wemoDevice;
chatId = configuration.telegramChatId;

function persists() {
    configuration.beeWiData = beeWiData;
    fs.writeFileSync(confPath, JSON.stringify(configuration));
}

function setSwitchState(state, callback) {
    wemo = new Wemo();
    wemo.discover(function(deviceInfo) {
        if (deviceInfo.friendlyName == wemoDevice) {
            console.log("device found:", deviceInfo.friendlyName, "setting the state to", state);
            var client = wemo.client(deviceInfo);
            client.on('binaryState', function(value) {
                callback();
            });

            client.on('statusChange', function(a) {
                console.log("statusChange", a);
            });
            client.setBinaryState(state);
        }
    });
}

beeWiData = {temperature: undefined, humidity: undefined, batery: undefined};

function hexToInt(hex) {
    if (hex.length % 2 !== 0) {
        hex = "0" + hex;
    }
    var num = parseInt(hex, 16);
    var maxVal = Math.pow(2, hex.length / 2 * 8);
    if (num > maxVal / 2 - 1) {
        num = num - maxVal;
    }
    return num;
}

noble.on('stateChange', function(state) {
    if (state === 'poweredOn') {
        noble.stopScanning();
        noble.startScanning();
    } else {
        noble.stopScanning();
    }
});

noble.on('scanStop', function() {
    var message, state;
    if (beeWiData.temperature > threshold) {
        state = 1;
        message = "temperature (" + beeWiData.temperature + ") over threshold (" + threshold + "). Fan ON. Humidity: " + beeWiData.humidity;
    } else {
        message = "temperature (" + beeWiData.temperature + ") under threshold (" + threshold + "). Fan OFF. Humidity: " + beeWiData.humidity;
        state = 0;
    }
    setSwitchState(state, function() {
        if (configuration.beeWiData.hasOwnProperty('temperature') && configuration.beeWiData.temperature < threshold && state === 1 || configuration.beeWiData.temperature > threshold && state === 0) {
            console.log("Notify to telegram bot", message);
            bot.sendMessage(chatId, message).then(function() {
                process.exit(0);
            }, function(e) {
                console.error(e);
                process.exit(0);
            });
            persists();
        } else {
            console.log(message);
            persists();
            process.exit(0);
        }
    });
});

noble.on('discover', function(peripheral) {
    if (peripheral.address == address) {
        var data = peripheral.advertisement.manufacturerData.toString('hex');
        beeWiData.temperature = parseFloat(hexToInt(data.substr(10, 2)+data.substr(8, 2))/10).toFixed(1);
        beeWiData.humidity = Math.min(100,parseInt(data.substr(14, 2),16));
        beeWiData.batery = parseInt(data.substr(24, 2),16);
        beeWiData.date = new Date();
        noble.stopScanning();
    }
});

setTimeout(function() {
    console.error("timeout exceded!");
    process.exit(0);
}, 5000);

The script is here.

It works but I wanted to keep on hacking. One Sunday morning I read this post. I don’t have an amazon button, but I wanted to do something similar. I started to play with scapy library sniffing ARP packets in my home network. I realize that I can detect when my Kindle connects to the network, my tv, or even my mobile phone. Then I had one I idea: Detect when my mobile phone connects to my wifi. My mobile phone connects to my wifi before I enter in my house so my idea was simple: Detect when I’m close to my home’s door and send me a telegram message saying “Wellcome home” in addition to the temperature inside my house at this moment.

#!/usr/bin/env python

import sys
from scapy.all import *
import telebot
import gearman
import json
from StringIO import StringIO

BUFFER_SIZE = 1024

try:
    with open(sys.argv[1]) as data_file:
        data = json.load(data_file)
        myPhone = data['myPhone']
        routerIP = data['routerIP']
        TOKEN = data['telegramBotAPIKey']
        chatID = data['telegramChatId']
        gearmanServer = data['gearmanServer']
except:
    print("Unexpected error:", sys.exc_info()[0])
    raise

def getSensorData():
    gm_client = gearman.GearmanClient([gearmanServer])
    completed_job_request = gm_client.submit_job("temp", '')
    io = StringIO(completed_job_request.result)

    return json.load(io)

tb = telebot.TeleBot(TOKEN)

def arp_display(pkt):
    if pkt[ARP].op == 1 and pkt[ARP].hwsrc == myPhone and pkt[ARP].pdst == routerIP:
        sensorData = getSensorData()
        message = "Wellcome home Gonzalo! Temperature: %s humidity: %s" % (sensorData['temperature'], sensorData['humidity'])
        tb.send_message(chatID, message)
        print message

print sniff(prn=arp_display, filter='arp', store=0)

I have one node script to read temperature and one Python script to sniff my network. I can find how to read temperature from Python and use only one script but I was lazy (remember that I was on holiday) so I turned the node script that reads temperature into a gearman worker.

var noble = require('noble'),
    fs = require('fs'),
    Gearman = require('node-gearman'),
    beeWiData,
    address,
    bot,
    configuration,
    confPath,
    status,
    callback;

var gearman = new Gearman();

if (process.argv.length <= 2) {
    console.log("Usage: " + __filename + " conf.json");
    process.exit(-1);
}

confPath = process.argv[2];
try {
    configuration = JSON.parse(
        fs.readFileSync(process.argv[2])
    );
} catch (e) {
    console.log("configuration file not valid", e);
    process.exit(-1);
}

address = configuration.beeWiAddress;
delay = configuration.tempServerDelayMinutes * 60 * 1000;
tcpPort = configuration.tempServerPort;

beeWiData = {};

function hexToInt(hex) {
    if (hex.length % 2 !== 0) {
        hex = "0" + hex;
    }
    var num = parseInt(hex, 16);
    var maxVal = Math.pow(2, hex.length / 2 * 8);
    if (num > maxVal / 2 - 1) {
        num = num - maxVal;
    }
    return num;
}

noble.on('stateChange', function(state) {
    if (state === 'poweredOn') {
        console.log("stateChange:poweredOn");
        status = true;
    } else {
        status = false;
    }
});

noble.on('discover', function(peripheral) {
    if (peripheral.address == address) {
        var data = peripheral.advertisement.manufacturerData.toString('hex');
        beeWiData.temperature = parseFloat(hexToInt(data.substr(10, 2)+data.substr(8, 2))/10).toFixed(1);
        beeWiData.humidity = Math.min(100,parseInt(data.substr(14, 2),16));
        beeWiData.batery = parseInt(data.substr(24, 2),16);
        beeWiData.date = new Date();
        noble.stopScanning();
    }
});

noble.on('scanStop', function() {
    console.log(beeWiData);
    noble.stopScanning();
    callback();
});

var worker;

function workerCallback(payload, worker) {
    callback = function() {
        worker.end(JSON.stringify(beeWiData));
    }

    beeWiData = {temperature: undefined, humidity: undefined, batery: undefined};

    if (status) {
        noble.stopScanning();
        noble.startScanning();
    } else {
        setInterval(function() {
            workerCallback(payload, worker);
        }, 1000);
    }
}

gearman.registerWorker("temp", workerCallback);

Now I only need to call this worker from my Python sniffer and thats all.

I wanted to play a little bit. I also wanted to ask the temperature on demand. Since I was using Telegram I had an idea. Create a Telegram bot running in my RP3. And that’s my summer pet project. Basically it has three parts:

worker.js
It’s a gearman worker. It reads temperature and humidity from my BeeWi sensor via BTLE

bot.py
It’s a Telegram bot with the following commands available:

/switchInfo: get switch info
/switchOFF: switch OFF the switch
/help: Gives you information about the available commands
/temp: Get temperature
/switchON: switch ON the switch

sniff.py
It’s just a ARP sniffer. It detects when I’m close to my home and sends me a message via Telegram with the temperature. It detects when my mobile phone sends a ARP package to my router (aka when I connect to my Wifi). It happens before I enter in my house, so the Telegram message arrives before I put the key in the door 🙂

I run al my scripts in my Raspberry Pi3. To ensure all scripts are up an running I use supervisor

All the scripts are available in my github account

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Reading Modbus devices with Python from a PHP/Silex Application via Gearman worker

Yes. I know. I never know how to write a good tittle to my posts. Let me show one integration example that I’ve been working with this days. Let’s start.

In industrial automation there’re several standard protocols. Modbus is one of them. Maybe isn’t the coolest or the newest one (like OPC or OPC/UA), but we can speak Modbus with a huge number of devices.

I need to read from one of them, and show a couple of variables in a Web frontend. Imagine the following fake Modbus server (it emulates my real Modbus device)

#!/usr/bin/env python

##
# Fake modbus server
# - exposes "Energy" 66706 = [1, 1170]
# - exposes "Power" 132242 = [2, 1170]
##

from pymodbus.datastore import ModbusSlaveContext, ModbusServerContext
from pymodbus.datastore import ModbusSequentialDataBlock
from pymodbus.server.async import StartTcpServer
import logging

logging.basicConfig()
log = logging.getLogger()
log.setLevel(logging.DEBUG)

hrData = [1, 1170, 2, 1170]
store = ModbusSlaveContext(hr=ModbusSequentialDataBlock(2, hrData))

context = ModbusServerContext(slaves=store, single=True)

StartTcpServer(context)

This server exposes two variables “Energy” and “Power”. This is a fake server and it will returns always 66706 for energy and 132242 for power. Mobus is a binary protocol so 66706 = [1, 1170] and 132242 = [2, 1170]

I can read Modbus from PHP, but normally use Python for this kind of logic. I’m not going to re-write an existing logic to PHP. I’m not crazy enough. Furthermore my real Modbus device only accepts one active socket to retrieve information. That’s means if two clients uses the frontend at the same time, it will crash. In this situations Queues are our friends.

I’ll use a Gearman worker (written in Python) to read Modbus information.

from pyModbusTCP.client import ModbusClient
from gearman import GearmanWorker
import json

def reader(worker, job):
    c = ModbusClient(host="localhost", port=502)

    if not c.is_open() and not c.open():
        print("unable to connect to host")

    if c.is_open():

        holdingRegisters = c.read_holding_registers(1, 4)

        # Imagine we've "energy" value in position 1 with two words
        energy = (holdingRegisters[0] << 16) | holdingRegisters[1]

        # Imagine we've "power" value in position 3 with two words
        power = (holdingRegisters[2] << 16) | holdingRegisters[3]

        out = {"energy": energy, "power": power}
        return json.dumps(out)
    return None

worker = GearmanWorker(['127.0.0.1'])

worker.register_task('modbusReader', reader)

print 'working...'
worker.work()

Our backend is ready. Now we’ll work with the frontend. In this example I’ll use PHP and Silex.

<?php
include __DIR__ . '/../vendor/autoload.php';
use Silex\Application;
$app = new Application(['debug' => true]);
$app->register(new Silex\Provider\TwigServiceProvider(), array(
    'twig.path' => __DIR__.'/../views',
));
$app['modbusReader'] = $app->protect(function() {
    $client = new \GearmanClient();
    $client->addServer();
    $handle = $client->doNormal('modbusReader', 'modbusReader');
    $returnCode = $client->returnCode();
    if ($returnCode != \GEARMAN_SUCCESS) {
        throw new \Exception($this->client->error(), $returnCode);
    } else {
        return json_decode($handle, true);
    }
});
$app->get("/", function(Application $app) {
    return $app['twig']->render('home.twig', $app['modbusReader']());
});
$app->run();

As we can see the frontend is a simple Gearman client. It uses our Python worker to read information from Modbus and render a simple html with a Twig template

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html lang="en">
<head>
    <meta charset="UTF-8">
    <title>Demo</title>
</head>
<body>
    Energy: {{ energy }}
    Power: {{ power }}
</body>
</html>

And that’s all. You can see the full example in my github account