Monthly Archives: June 2014

Setting up states from a json file in angularjs applications

Imagine a this simple angularjs application using angular-ui-router:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
    <meta charset="utf-8">
    <title>Example</title>
    <script src="bower_components/angular/angular.js"></script>
    <script src="bower_components/angular-ui-router/release/angular-ui-router.js"></script>
    <script src="js/app.js"></script>

</head>
<body ng-app="App" ng-controller="MainController">

<div ui-view></div>
</body>
</html>

angular.module('App', ['ui.router'])

    .config(function ($stateProvider, $urlRouterProvider, routerProvider) {
        $stateProvider
            .state('home', {
                url: '/home',
                templateUrl: 'templates/home.html'
            });

        $urlRouterProvider.otherwise('/home');
    })

    .controller('MainController', function ($scope, router) {
        $scope.reload = function() {
            router.setUpRoutes();
        };
    })
;

We’ve defined only one state called “home”. If we need more states we just add more within config() function. In this post we’re going to try to add more states from a json file instead of hardcode the states within the code.

Let’s create our json file with the states definitions:

{
    "xxx": {
        "url": "/xxx",
        "templateUrl": "templates/xxx.html"
    },

    "yyy": {
        "url": "/yyy",
        "templateUrl": "templates/yyy.html"
    },

    "zzz": {
        "url": "/zzz",
        "templateUrl": "templates/zzz.html"
    }
}

Now our application looks like this:

angular.module('App', ['ui.router', 'Routing'])

    .config(function ($stateProvider, $urlRouterProvider, routerProvider) {
        $stateProvider
            .state('home', {
                url: '/home',
                templateUrl: 'templates/home.html'
            });

        $urlRouterProvider.otherwise('/home');

        routerProvider.setCollectionUrl('js/routeCollection.json');
    })

    .controller('MainController', function ($scope, router) {
        $scope.reload = function() {
            router.setUpRoutes();
        };
    })
;

As we can see now we’re using ‘Routing’

angular.module('Routing', ['ui.router'])
    .provider('router', function ($stateProvider) {

        var urlCollection;

        this.$get = function ($http, $state) {
            return {
                setUpRoutes: function () {
                    $http.get(urlCollection).success(function (collection) {
                        for (var routeName in collection) {
                            if (!$state.get(routeName)) {
                                $stateProvider.state(routeName, collection[routeName]);
                            }
                        }
                    });
                }
            }
        };

        this.setCollectionUrl = function (url) {
            urlCollection = url;
        }
    })

    .run(function (router) {
        router.setUpRoutes();
    });

‘Routing’ provides us a provider called ‘router’ that fetch the json file and build the states.

That’s a proof of concept.
There’s a couple of problems (please tell me if you know how to solve them):

  • As far as we’re loading states from a http connection, angular application don’t have all the states when it starts, so we need to create at least the first state with the “old style”
  • We can reload states with the application running. We also can add new states, but we cannot modify the existing ones.

you can see the one example project within my github account.

Token based authentication with Silex and AngularJS

According to my last post today we’re going to create a AngularJS application that uses the Silex Backend that we create previously. The idea of this application is to use it within a Phonegap/Cordova application running in a mobile device.

The application will be show a login form if device haven’t a correct token.

Gonzalo_Login_Example_and_LoginServiceProvider_php_-_token_-____work_projects_token_

And whit a correct token:

Gonzalo_Login_Example

Nothing new under the sun, isn’t it?

Our front-end application will use AngularJS and Topcoat.

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html xmlns:ng="http://angularjs.org" lang="es" ng-app="G">
<head>
    <meta charset="utf-8"/>
    <meta name="format-detection" content="telephone=no"/>
    <!-- WARNING: for iOS 7, remove the width=device-width and height=device-height attributes. See https://issues.apache.org/jira/browse/CB-4323 -->
    <meta name="viewport"
          content="user-scalable=no, initial-scale=1, maximum-scale=1, minimum-scale=1, width=device-width, height=device-height, target-densitydpi=device-dpi"/>
    <link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="/bower_components/topcoat/css/topcoat-mobile-light.min.css">
    <title>Gonzalo Login Example</title>
</head>
<body ng-controller="MainController">

<div ng-view class="main-content"></div>

<script src="/bower_components/angular/angular.min.js"></script>
<script src="/bower_components/angular-route/angular-route.min.js"></script>

<script src="js/app.js"></script>
<script src="js/services.js"></script>

</body>
</html>

And our AngularJS application:

'use strict';
var appControllers, G;
var host = 'http://localhost:8080'; // server API url

appControllers = angular.module('appControllers', []);
G = angular.module('G', ['ngRoute', 'appControllers']);

G.run(function (httpG) {
    httpG.setHost(host);
});

G.config(['$routeProvider', function ($routeProvider) {
    $routeProvider.
        when('/login', {templateUrl: 'partials/login.html', controller: 'LoginController'}).
        when('/home', {templateUrl: 'partials/home.html', controller: 'HomeController'});
}]);

appControllers.controller('HomeController', ['$scope', 'httpG', '$location', function ($scope, httpG, $location) {
    $scope.hello = function () {
        httpG.get('/api/info').success(function (data) {
            if (data.status) {
                alert("Hello " + data.info.name + " " + data.info.surname);
            }
        });
    };

    $scope.logOut = function () {
        alert("Good bye!");
        httpG.removeToken();
        $scope.isAuthenticated = false;
        $location.path('login');
    };
}]);

appControllers.controller('MainController', ['$scope', '$location', 'httpG', function ($scope, $location, httpG) {
    $scope.isAuthenticated = false;

    if (httpG.getToken()) {
        $scope.isAuthenticated = true;
        $location.path('home');
    } else {
        $location.path('login');
    }
}]);


appControllers.controller('LoginController', ['$scope', '$location', 'httpG', function ($scope, $location, httpG) {
    $scope.user = {};

    $scope.doLogIn = function () {
        httpG.get('/auth/validateCredentials', {user: $scope.user.username, pass: $scope.user.password}).success(function (data) {
            if (data.status) {
                httpG.setToken(data.info.token);
                $scope.isAuthenticated = true;
                $location.path('home');
            } else {
                alert("login error");
            }
        }).error(function (error) {
            alert("Login Error!");
        });
    };

    $scope.doLogOut = function () {
        httpG.removeToken();
    };
}]);

In this example I’m using angular-route to handle the application’s routes. Nowadays I’m swaping to angular-ui-router, but this example I’m still using “old-style” routes. We define two partials:

partial/home.html

<div class="topcoat-button-bar full" style="position: fixed; bottom: 0px;">
    <label class="topcoat-button-bar__item">
        <button class="topcoat-button full" ng-click="logOut()">
            <span class="">Logout</span>
        </button>
    </label>
    <label class="topcoat-button-bar__item">
        <button class="topcoat-button--cta full" ng-click="hello()">
            <span class="">Hello</span>
        </button>
    </label>
</div>

partial/login.html

<div class="topcoat-navigation-bar">
    <div class="topcoat-navigation-bar__item center full">
        <h1 class="topcoat-navigation-bar__title">Login</h1>
    </div>
</div>

<ul class="topcoat-list__container">
    <li class="topcoat-list__item center">
        <input ng-model="user.username" class="topcoat-text-input--large" type="text" name="user"
               placeholder="Username"/>
    </li>
    <li class="topcoat-list__item center">
        <input ng-model="user.password" class="topcoat-text-input--large" type="password" name="pass"
               placeholder="Password"/>
    </li>
</ul>

<div class="topcoat-button-bar full" style="position: fixed; bottom: 0px;">
    <label class="topcoat-button-bar__item">
        <button class="topcoat-button--cta full" ng-click="doLogIn()">
            <span class="">Login</span>
        </button>
    </label>
</div>

As we can see in the application we’re using a service to handle Http connections with the token information.

'use strict';

G.factory('httpG', ['$http', '$window', function ($http, $window) {
    var serviceToken, serviceHost, tokenKey;
    tokenKey = 'token';
    if (localStorage.getItem(tokenKey)) {
        serviceToken = $window.localStorage.getItem(tokenKey);
    }

    $http.defaults.headers.post["Content-Type"] = "application/x-www-form-urlencoded";

    return {
        setHost: function (host) {
            serviceHost = host;
        },

        setToken: function (token) {
            serviceToken = token;
            $window.localStorage.setItem(tokenKey, token);
        },

        getToken: function () {
            return serviceToken;
        },

        removeToken: function() {
            serviceToken = undefined;
            $window.localStorage.removeItem(tokenKey);
        },

        get: function (uri, params) {
            params = params || {};
            params['_token'] = serviceToken;
            return $http.get(serviceHost + uri, {params: params});
        },

        post: function (uri, params) {
            params = params || {};
            params['_token'] = serviceToken;

            return $http.post(serviceHost + uri, params);
        }
    };
}]);

And that’s all. You can see the full example in my github account.

Talk about SOLID and Symfony at the deSymfony 2014 conference.

Last saturday I attended to the deSymfony conference in Barcelona. A great opportunity to meet again with the PHP and Symfony community in Spain. This year the conference accepted my talk about SOLID and Symfony. Here you can see the slides of the talk (slides in spanish):

The conference was perfect. Barcelona is an incredible city and the conference place (10 minutes walking from the Sagrada Familia), was incredible too. Great talks. But the best, as always, the coffe breaks with the conversations with the Symfony and PHP community from Valencia, Zaragoza, Madrid, Barcelona, …

That’s me in action speaking about SOLID principles and Symfony:
Bo90AasCMAAdHL8 (photo source)

But the best of my speech was in the opposite direction. Many thanks to all of you 🙂

20140531_152345